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Pupil dilation reflects perceptual selection and predicts subsequent stability in perceptual rivalry

Einhäuser, Wolfgang and Stout, James and Koch, Christof and Carter, Olivia (2008) Pupil dilation reflects perceptual selection and predicts subsequent stability in perceptual rivalry. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 105 (5). pp. 1704-1709. ISSN 0027-8424. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:EINpnas08

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PDF (Table 1. Dominance durations for individual subjects and stimuli) - Supplemental Material
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PDF (Fig. 4. Pupil dilation for individual subjects and stimuli. Pupil dilation for individual subjects (columns) and stimuli (rows) in a ±3-s interval around reported perceptual switch (t = 0s) for the immediate report condition of experiment 1.) - Supplemental Material
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PDF (Fig. 6. Individual eye position results. Eye positions (distance from center, normalized to z-scores in analogy to the treatment of pupil dilation) for individual subjects (columns) and stimuli (rows) in a ± 3-s interval around reported perceptual switch) - Supplemental Material
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Abstract

During sustained viewing of an ambiguous stimulus, an individual's perceptual experience will generally switch between the different possible alternatives rather than stay fixed on one interpretation (perceptual rivalry). Here, we measured pupil diameter while subjects viewed different ambiguous visual and auditory stimuli. For all stimuli tested, pupil diameter increased just before the reported perceptual switch and the relative amount of dilation before this switch was a significant predictor of the subsequent duration of perceptual stability. These results could not be explained by blink or eye-movement effects, the motor response or stimulus driven changes in retinal input. Because pupil dilation reflects levels of norepinephrine (NE) released from the locus coeruleus (LC), we interpret these results as suggestive that the LC–NE complex may play the same role in perceptual selection as in behavioral decision making.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0707727105DOIArticle
http://www.pnas.org/content/105/5/1704.abstractPublisherArticle
http://www.pnas.org/content/105/5/1704/suppl/DC1PublisherSupplemental material
Additional Information:© 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA. Edited by Dale Purves, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, and approved December 18, 2007 (received for review August 16, 2007). Published online before print February 4, 2008, doi: 10.1073/pnas.0707727105. This article is a PNAS Direct Submission. The work was supported by Swiss National Science Foundation Grant PA00A-111447 (to W.E.); the Defense Advanced Research Planning Agency/National Geospatial Intelligence Agency; the National Science Foundation; the National Institute of Mental Health; and the National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) C.J. Martin Fellowship 368525 (to O.C.). Author contributions: W.E. and O.C. designed research; W.E., J.S., and C.K. performed research; C.K. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; W.E. analyzed data; and W.E. and O.C. wrote the paper. The authors declare no conflict of interest. This article contains supporting information online at www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/0707727105/DC1. See also: Wolfgang Einhäuser, James Stout, Christof Koch, and Olivia Carter. Reply to Hupé et al.: The predictive correlation of pupil dilation and relative dominance durations in rivalry is not a statistical artifact. PNAS 105(28):E44 doi:10.1073/pnas.0803927105
Group:Koch Laboratory, KLAB
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Swiss National Science FoundationPA00A-111447
Defense Advanced Research Planning AgencyUNSPECIFIED
National Geospatial Intelligence AgencyUNSPECIFIED
National Science FoundationUNSPECIFIED
National Institute of Mental HealthUNSPECIFIED
National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia), C.J. Martin Fellowship368525
Subject Keywords:attention; norepinephrine; vision; decision making
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:EINpnas08
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:EINpnas08
Official Citation:Wolfgang Einhäuser, James Stout, Christof Koch, and Olivia Carter. From the Cover: Pupil dilation reflects perceptual selection and predicts subsequent stability in perceptual rivalryPNAS 2008 105:1704-1709; published online before print February 4, 2008, doi:10.1073/pnas.0707727105
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:11169
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Archive Administrator
Deposited On:21 Jul 2008 23:02
Last Modified:14 Nov 2014 19:20

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