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The Evolution of Cavitation Events with Speed and Scale of the Flow

Waniewski, Tricia A. and Brennen, Christopher E. (1999) The Evolution of Cavitation Events with Speed and Scale of the Flow. In: 3rd ASME/JSME Joint Fluids Engineering Conference, 18-23 July 1999, San Francisco, CA, USA. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:WANfedsm99

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Abstract

This paper focuses on the different forms that individual cavitating events may take when the cavitation number is below the inception value (but not so low as to produce only attached cavities) and individual nuclei trigger individual cavitation events. It is a sequel to those of Kuhn de Chizelle et al. (1992a, 1992b, 1995) which described a set of cavitation scaling observations on simple Schiebe headforms conducted in the US Navy Large Cavitation Channel (LCC). The most common events observed in those experiments were traveling, hemi-spherical shaped bubbles which grew and collapsed as they were convected through the low pressure region on the headform. Several interesting variations were also observed, including the development of bubble tails and the triggering of patches, or local regions of attached cavitation. In the present paper, the frequency of occurrence of the various types of events is analyzed as well as how those probabilities changed with cavitation number, velocity and headform size. In general, the probabilities of tails and patches increased with decreasing cavitation number, but they also increased with increasing headform size and increasing velocity. A specific parametric dependence on these variables is suggested.


Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information:FEDSM99-7916. The authors are grateful to Yan Kuhn de Chizelle and Steven Ceccio for acquiescing to our use of the data from the LCC experiments which were conducted jointly with the second author (CEB). The second author would also like to acknowledge the early analysis of event types done by Patrick Brennen. This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research (technical monitor, Edwin Rood) under Contract N00014-91-J-1295.
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:WANfedsm99
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:WANfedsm99
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:162
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Christopher Brennen
Deposited On:09 Nov 2004
Last Modified:26 Dec 2012 08:39

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