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On the Direct and Radiated Components of the Collisional Particle Pressure in Liquid-Solid Flows

Zenit, R. and Hunt, M. L. and Brennen, C. E. (1998) On the Direct and Radiated Components of the Collisional Particle Pressure in Liquid-Solid Flows. Applied Scientific Research, 58 (1-4). pp. 305-317. ISSN 0003-6994. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:ZENasr98

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Abstract

In a recent study the collisional particle pressure was measured for liquid fluidized beds and liquid-solid flows. The particle pressure was defined as the 'additional pressure' generated by the presence of the particle-solid phase in a liquid-solid mixture. The particle pressure generated by collisions of particles was found to be composed of two main contributions: one from pressure pulses generated by direct collisions of particles against the containing walls (direct component), and a second one from pressure pulses due to collisions between individual particles that are transmitted through the liquid (radiated component). This paper presents a summary of the technique to measure the particle pressure and the main results of that study. Additional experiments were performed to further study each one of the components of the particle pressure. The direct component was studied by impacting particles on the active face of the pressure transducer. The magnitude of the measured impulse was found to be related to the impact velocity, the mass and the size of the impacting particle. By comparing the measurements with the predictions from the Hertzian theory, a quantification of the interstitial fluid effects could be obtained. The radiated component was investigated by generating binary collisions of particles in the vicinity of the transducer. The magnitude of the measured impulse was found to be a function of fluid density, particle size and impact velocity. Predictions based on impulse-pressure theory were obtained and compared with the experimental measurements. The model results showed good agreement with the experimental measurements.


Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Dedicated to Leen van Wijngaarden, a true scholar, from whom C.E.B. learnt much about fluid mechanics. The National Council for Science and Technology of Mexico (CONACYT) is acknowledged for partially supporting R. Zenit during his graduate sojourn at the California Institute of Technology.
Subject Keywords:particle pressure, liquid-solid flow
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:ZENasr98
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:ZENasr98
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:178
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Christopher Brennen
Deposited On:10 Nov 2004
Last Modified:26 Dec 2012 08:39

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