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Antibodies against a synthetic peptide of the poliovirus replicase protein: reaction with native, virus-encoded proteins and inhibition of virus-specific polymerase activities in vitro

Baron, Margaret H. and Baltimore, David (1982) Antibodies against a synthetic peptide of the poliovirus replicase protein: reaction with native, virus-encoded proteins and inhibition of virus-specific polymerase activities in vitro. Journal of Virology, 43 (3). pp. 969-978. ISSN 0022-538X. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:BARjvir82

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Abstract

A carboxy-terminal peptide of the poliovirus replicase protein (p63) was chemically synthesized, coupled to bovine serum albumin carrier, and injected into rabbits. The resulting antisera reacted with six virus-specific proteins from HeLa cells infected with poliovirus: NCVP 0b, NCVP 1b, NCVP 2, a protein of about 60,000 daltons, p63, and NCVP 6b. The identity of the 60,000-dalton protein is not known, but the other results were consistent with previous experimental approaches which demonstrated that p63 and the other four polypeptides have common coding sequences. An amino-terminal peptide of p63 failed to elicit an immune response in rabbits. Antibodies raised against the p63 carboxy-terminal peptide inhibited poliovirus replicase and polyuridylic acid polymerase activities in vitro, providing strong support for earlier suggestions that these activities are a property of a single virus-specific polypeptide.


Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Copyright © 1982 by the American Society for Microbiology. Received 16 February 1982/Accepted 18 May 1982 We thank Andrew Laudano for many helpful discussions and for his active interest in the work reported here. We thank Michael Rosenblatt for advice concerning the synthesis and cleavage of tryptophan-containing peptides and for allowing us to use his laboratory's HF line. Finally, we thank John Raffensperger for assistance with the HF cleavage procedure. M.H.B. is a predoctoral scholar of the Insurance Medical Scientist Scholarship Fund and a fellow of the Danforth Foundation. D.B. is an American Cancer Society Professor of Microbiology. This research was supported by Public Health Service grants from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease and from the National Cancer Institute.
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:BARjvir82
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:BARjvir82
Alternative URL:http://jvi.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/43/3/969
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ID Code:2242
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
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Deposited On:17 Mar 2006
Last Modified:26 Dec 2012 08:48

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