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Rhombomere rotation reveals that multiple mechanisms contribute to the segmental pattern of hindbrain neural crest migration

Sechrist, John and Scherson, Talma and Bronner, Marianne E. (1994) Rhombomere rotation reveals that multiple mechanisms contribute to the segmental pattern of hindbrain neural crest migration. Development, 120 (7). pp. 1777-1790. ISSN 0950-1991. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20120223-085026338

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Abstract

Hindbrain neural crest cells adjacent to rhombomeres 2 (r2), r4 and r6 migrate in a segmental pattern, toward the first, second and third branchial arches, respectively. Although all rhombomeres generate neural crest cells, those arising from r3 and r5 deviate rostrally and caudally (J. Sechrist, G. Serbedzija, T. Scherson, S. Fraser and M. Bronner-Fraser (1993) Development 118, 691–703). We have altered the rostrocaudal positions of the cranial neural tube, adjacent ectoderm/mesoderm or presumptive otic vesicle to examine tissue influences on this segmental migratory pattern. After neural tube rotation, labeled neural crest cells follow pathways generally appropriate for their new position after grafting. For example, when r3 and r4 were transposed, labeled r3 cells migrated laterally to the second branchial arch whereas labeled r4 cells primarily deviated caudally toward the second arch, with some cells moving rostrally toward the first. In contrast to r4 neural crest cells, transposed r3 cells leave the neural tube surface in a polarized manner, near the r3/4 border. Surprisingly, some labeled neural crest cells moved directionally toward small ectopic otic vesicles that often formed in the ectoderm adjacent to grafted r4. Similarly, they moved toward grafted or displaced otic vesicles. In contrast, surgical manipulation of the mesoderm adjacent to r3 and r4 had no apparent effects. Our results offer evidence that neural crest cells migrate directionally toward the otic vesicle, either by selective attraction or pathway-derived cues.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dev.biologists.org/content/120/7/1777PublisherUNSPECIFIED
Additional Information:© 1994 The Company of Biologists Limited. Accepted 25 March 1994. We thank Dr Scott Fraser and Mary Dickinson for invaluable comments on the manuscript and Helene Lesterlin, Simone Lutolf, Roham Zamanian and Parisa Zarbafian for excellent technical assistance with photography, cryosectioning and some embryonic microsurgeries. We also thank Dr Mark Selleck for assistance with some of the computer images. Figures 7B,C were made using an Edge microscope (courtesy of Linda Wegner and Gary Greenberg of Edge Scientific Instrument Corp.) This work was supported by USPHSHD- 25138 and a Muscular Dystrophy Grant to M. B.-F.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
U. S. Public Health Service (USPHS)HD-25138
Muscular Dystrophy GrantUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:rhombomere, neural crest, cell migration
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20120223-085026338
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20120223-085026338
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:29428
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:23 Feb 2012 19:09
Last Modified:26 Dec 2012 14:52

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