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Maturation of viral proteins in cells infected with temperature-sensitive mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus

Knipe, David M. and Baltimore, David and Lodish, Harvey F. (1977) Maturation of viral proteins in cells infected with temperature-sensitive mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus. Journal of Virology, 21 (3). pp. 1149-1158. ISSN 0022-538X. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20120727-110057001

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Abstract

Maturation of viral proteins in cells infected with mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus was studied by surface iodination and cell fractionation. The movement of G, M, and N proteins to the virion bud appeared to be interdependent. Mutations thought to be in G protein prevented its migration to the cell surface, allowed neither M nor N protein to become membrane bound, and blocked formation of viral particles. Mutant G protein appeared not to leave the endoplasmic reticulum at the nonpermissive temperature, but this defect was partially reversible. In cells infected with mutants that caused N protein to be degraded rapidly or prevented its assembly into nucleocapsids, M protein did not bind to membranes and G protein matured to the cell surface, but never entered structures with the density of virions. Mutations causing M protein to be degraded prevented virion formation, and G protein behaved as in cells infected by mutants in N protein. These results are consistent with a model of virion formation involving coalescence of soluble nucleocapsid and soluble M protein with G protein already in the plasma membrane.


Item Type:Article
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http://jvi.asm.org/content/21/3/1149.abstractPublisherUNSPECIFIED
Additional Information:© 1977 American Society for Microbiology. Received for publication 10 September 1976. We gratefully acknowledge the technical assistance of Martin Brock. D.K. was supported by a National Science Foundation predoctoral fellowship during part of this work and a Public Health Service traineeship during the remainder. D.B. is an American Cancer Society research professor. H.F.L. was the recipient of Public Health Service research career development award GM-50175 from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences. This work was supported by Public Health Service grants AI-08814 and AI-08388 from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, American Cancer Society grant E559, and Public Health Service grant CA-12174 from the National Cancer Institute.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSF Predoctoral Fellowship UNSPECIFIED
Public Health Service traineeshipUNSPECIFIED
Public Health Service research career development awardGM-50175
National Institute of General Medical SciencesUNSPECIFIED
Public Health ServiceAI-08814
Public Health ServiceAI-08388
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesUNSPECIFIED
American Cancer SocietyE559
Public Health ServiceCA-12174
National Cancer InstituteUNSPECIFIED
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20120727-110057001
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20120727-110057001
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:32769
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Jason Perez
Deposited On:30 Jul 2012 15:18
Last Modified:30 Jul 2012 15:18

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