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Quantitative resolution of the debate over antiquity of the central Australian landscape: implications for the tectonic and geomorphic stability of cratonic interiors

Belton, D. X. and Brown, R. W. and Kohn, B. P. and Fink, D. and Farley, K. A. (2004) Quantitative resolution of the debate over antiquity of the central Australian landscape: implications for the tectonic and geomorphic stability of cratonic interiors. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 219 (1-2). pp. 21-34. ISSN 0012-821X. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20121119-103337376

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Abstract

We report the first measure of long- (∼100 Myr) and short- (∼1 Myr) term denudation rates from key geologically stable landforms in the Davenport Range, central Australia. These landforms have previously been assigned a Cambrian age, which arguably places them amongst the oldest persistent landforms on the continent, if not on Earth. Our results from combined apatite fission track thermochronology and in situ cosmogenic radionuclide analyses using ^(10)Be and ^(26)Al show that while average exhumation rates are low, the denudation history for this cratonic region is incompatible with extreme, sub-aerial longevity and long-term tectonic and geomorphic stability. Our revised model for the landscape evolution of this region is consistent with one of maximum burial prior to and during the Mesozoic, followed by a phase of kilometre-scale exhumation that was largely complete by the beginning of the Cainozoic. We suggest that a similar process of burial and exhumation has probably been responsible for the sub-aerial preservation of seemingly ancient landforms elsewhere in Australia.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0012-821X(03)00705-2DOIUNSPECIFIED
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012821X03007052PublisherUNSPECIFIED
Additional Information:© 2004 Elsevier B.V. Received 11 May 2003; received in revised form 7 July 2003; accepted 4 December 2003. This work was funded by the Australian Research Council, the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) and the Australian Geodynamics Cooperative Research Centre. D.X.B. was supported by an AINSE postgraduate scholarship and R.W.B. acknowledges the support of a University of Melbourne Research Career Establishment Grant. We extend our thanks to Alistair Stewart for field information and encouragement. Thanks to Derek Fabel and Kerry Gallagher for critically reviewing the manuscript.[BW]
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Australian Research CouncilUNSPECIFIED
Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE)UNSPECIFIED
Australian Geodynamics Cooperative Research UNSPECIFIED
Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) postgraduate scholarshipUNSPECIFIED
University of Melbourne Research Career Establishment grantUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:landscape evolution; denudation; apatite; fission track analysis; cosmogenic radionuclides; Davenport Range; Alice Springs Orogeny; Australia
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20121119-103337376
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20121119-103337376
Official Citation:D.X. Belton, R.W. Brown, B.P. Kohn, D. Fink, K.A. Farley, Quantitative resolution of the debate over antiquity of the central Australian landscape: implications for the tectonic and geomorphic stability of cratonic interiors, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Volume 219, Issues 1–2, 28 February 2004, Pages 21-34, ISSN 0012-821X, 10.1016/S0012-821X(03)00705-2. (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012821X03007052)
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:35538
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Ruth Sustaita
Deposited On:19 Nov 2012 18:49
Last Modified:19 Nov 2012 18:49

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