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Metabolism of sulfonic acids and other organosulfur compounds by sulfate-reducing bacteria

Lie, Thomas J. and Leadbetter, Jared R. and Leadbetter, Edward R. (1998) Metabolism of sulfonic acids and other organosulfur compounds by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Geomicrobiology Journal, 15 (2). pp. 135-149. ISSN 0149-0451. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20130430-111257099

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Abstract

This article presents a short review of recent research that established the ability of sulfate‐reducing bacteria to utilize sulfonic acids as terminal electron acceptors (TEA) for anaerobic respiratory growth. Newer studies of the bacterium most intensively investigated, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, strain ICI, are also reported. When either of two sulfonic acids examined—isethionate (2‐hydroxyethanesulfonate) or cysteate (alanine‐3‐sulfonate)—served as sole TEA, key changes in the cells’ enzymo‐logical profile occurred: decreased production of two enzymes involved in sulfate reduction, namely, ATP sulfurylase and APS reductase. Similar reduction in content of these enzymes was seen when either sulfite or fumarate served as TEA. Protein profiles (polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) of extracts of cells grown with different TEA revealed the presence of a 97‐kD polypeptide apparently unique to isethionate‐grown cells; a different polypeptide was noted in extracts of cysteate‐grown cells. The absence of such stained bands in extracts of sulfate‐grown cells suggests that these polypeptides are involved in utilization of sulfonic acids as TEA. H2 threshold values of cells growth with isethionate as TEA were significantly lower than for cells growing with sulfate or sulfite, suggesting that energy may be conserved in the cleavage of isethionate's C‐S linkage. A survey of the distribution of sulfonic acids in diverse habitats combined with the ability of other anaerobic bacteria to respire these compounds leads to the suggestion sulfonate reduction is likely to be significant in the sulfur cycle.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01490459809378070DOIUNSPECIFIED
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01490459809378070PublisherUNSPECIFIED
Additional Information:© 1998 Taylor & Francis. Received 20 September 1997; accepted 23 October 1997. We are grateful for support provided by the Institute of Water Resources (U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior, grant 14-08-0001-G2009), the University of Connecticut Research Foundation, and Proctor and Gamble. Thomas J. Lie was a trainee of a National Science Foundation Research Training Grant (520356), Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. We thank Prof. Pieter Visscher and anonymous reviewers for comments and suggestions that resulted in an improved manuscript, and Dr. Jan Gerritse for cultures of Desulfitobacterium.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Institute of Water ResourcesUNSPECIFIED
USGS14-08-0001-G2009
University of Connecticut Research Foundation UNSPECIFIED
Proctor and GambleUNSPECIFIED
NSF Training Grant520356
Subject Keywords:anaerobic respiration; cysteic acid; Desulfovibrio; isethionic acid; organosulfur compounds; sulfate-reducing bacteria; sulfide; sulfonic acids; sulfur cycle; taurine
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20130430-111257099
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20130430-111257099
Official Citation:Lie, Thomas J. and Leadbetter, Jared R. and Leadbetter, Edward R. (1998) Metabolism of sulfonic acids and other organosulfur compounds by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Geomicrobiology Journal, 15 (2). pp. 135-149.
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:38181
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:02 May 2013 23:57
Last Modified:02 May 2013 23:57

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