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Virustat, a Device for Continuous Production of Viruses

Jacobson, Homer and Jacobson, Leslie S. (1966) Virustat, a Device for Continuous Production of Viruses. Applied Microbiology, 14 (6). pp. 940-952. ISSN 0003-6919. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:JACappmicrob66

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Abstract

Methods for continuous production of viruses, and operation of the virustat, an apparatus in which such production was accomplished, were studied. Continuous production requires a separate continuous host growth chamber, such as the chemostat, and a multiunit virus growth chamber into which the virus-inoculated host cells are led. Successful continuous output of MS-2 and {phi}X174 viruses, the latter in lysates, over periods of several days and at titers approximating those of batch lysates, was observed. Design problems include chamber sizes and flow rates, growth of resistant mutants within both virus and host growth chambers, clogging by lysis debris, and the phenomenon of self-inoculation. The latter represents virus growth in the first section of the chamber in excess of the washout rate, leading to lack of need for virus inoculation after an initial period. Use of the virustat for production and research purposes will require some attention to the formation of resistant bacterial colonies at pockets and surface sites of limited washout. With the virustat as a continuous virus production device, continuous purification methods are desirable. Research use of the virustat in continuous mutagenic population studies would require suppression of self-inoculation by use of many sections in the chamber, and improved servo control of host populations at low concentrations.


Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Copyright © 1966 American Society for Microbiology. Received for publication 31 May 1966 We gratefully acknowledge fellowship support from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and the National Institutes of Health for one of us (H.J.) during the conception and design of the virustat, and research grant support from the National Institutes of Health, project GMS-09023. We thank the National Science Foundation for support of Richard Sohn, whose data on runs phi7-phi11 are reproduced here, as NSFURPP student. We also thank R. L. Sinsheimer for hospitality in his laboratory, basic cultures, and critical discussions. The method and apparatus described are the subject of a patent application owned by the California Institute Research Foundation.
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:JACappmicrob66
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:JACappmicrob66
Alternative URL:http://aem.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/14/6/940
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ID Code:3985
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Deposited On:21 Jul 2006
Last Modified:26 Dec 2012 08:57

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