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ACE-ASIA - Regional climatic and atmospheric chemical effects of Asian dust and pollution

Seinfeld, John H. and Carmichael, Gregory R. and Arimoto, Richard and Conant, William C. and Brechtel, Frederick J. and Bates, Timothy S. and Cahill, Thomas A. and Clarke, Antony D. and Doherty, Sarah J. and Flatau, Piotr J. and Huebert, Barry J. and Kim, Jiyoung and Markowicz, Krzysztof M. and Quinn, Patricia K. and Russell, Lynn M. and Russell, Philip B. and Shimizu, Atsushi and Shinozuka, Yohei and Song, Chul H. and Tang, Youhua and Uno, Itsushi and Vogelmann, Andrew M. and Weber, Rodney J. and Woo, Jung-Hun and Zhang, Xiao Y. (2004) ACE-ASIA - Regional climatic and atmospheric chemical effects of Asian dust and pollution. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 85 (3). pp. 367-380. ISSN 0003-0007. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:SEIbams04a

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Abstract

Although continental-scale plumes of Asian dust and pollution reduce the amount of solar radiation reaching the earth's surface and perturb the chemistry of the atmosphere, our ability to quantify these effects has been limited by a lack of critical observations, particularly of layers above the surface. Comprehensive surface, airborne, shipboard, and satellite measurements of Asian aerosol chemical composition, size, optical properties, and radiative impacts were performed during the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) study. Measurements within a massive Chinese dust storm at numerous widely spaced sampling locations revealed the highly complex structure of the atmosphere, in which layers of dust, urban pollution, and biomass-burning smoke may be transported long distances as distinct entities or mixed together. The data allow a first-time assessment of the regional climatic and atmospheric chemical effects of a continental-scale mixture of dust and pollution. Our results show that radiative flux reductions during such episodes are sufficient to cause regional climate change.


Item Type:Article
Additional Information:©2004 American Meterological Society. In final form 19 September 2003. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation (the lead agency for ACEAsia), the Office of Naval Research, and NOAA. This research is a contribution to the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program (IGBP), and is part of the IGAC Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE).
Subject Keywords:CHEJU ISLAND; AEROSOL COMPOSITION; SEASONAL-VARIATION; NORTH PACIFIC; SURFACE; KOREA; BIOMASS; SYSTEM; OXIDES; WATER
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:SEIbams04a
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:SEIbams04a
Alternative URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/BAMS-85-3-367
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:7720
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Lindsay Cleary
Deposited On:16 Jul 2007
Last Modified:26 Dec 2012 09:34

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