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Extreme mechanical resilience of self-assembled nanolabyrinthine materials

Portela, Carlos M. and Vidyasagar, A. and Krödel, Sebastian and Weissenbach, Tamara and Yee, Daryl W. and Greer, Julia R. and Kochmann, Dennis M. (2020) Extreme mechanical resilience of self-assembled nanolabyrinthine materials. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 117 (11). pp. 5686-5693. ISSN 0027-8424. PMCID PMC7084143 . https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20200304-130419102

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Abstract

Low-density materials with tailorable properties have attracted attention for decades, yet stiff materials that can resiliently tolerate extreme forces and deformation while being manufactured at large scales have remained a rare find. Designs inspired by nature, such as hierarchical composites and atomic lattice-mimicking architectures, have achieved optimal combinations of mechanical properties but suffer from limited mechanical tunability, limited long-term stability, and low-throughput volumes that stem from limitations in additive manufacturing techniques. Based on natural self-assembly of polymeric emulsions via spinodal decomposition, here we demonstrate a concept for the scalable fabrication of nonperiodic, shell-based ceramic materials with ultralow densities, possessing features on the order of tens of nanometers and sample volumes on the order of cubic centimeters. Guided by simulations of separation processes, we numerically show that the curvature of self-assembled shells can produce close to optimal stiffness scaling with density, and we experimentally demonstrate that a carefully chosen combination of topology, geometry, and base material results in superior mechanical resilience in the architected product. Our approach provides a pathway to harnessing self-assembly methods in the design and scalable fabrication of beyond-periodic and nonbeam-based nano-architected materials with simultaneous directional tunability, high stiffness, and unsurpassed recoverability with marginal deterioration.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1916817117DOIArticle
https://www.pnas.org/content/suppl/2020/03/03/1916817117.DCSupplementalPublisherSupporting Information
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmc7084143/PubMed CentralArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Portela, Carlos M.0000-0002-2649-4235
Krödel, Sebastian0000-0002-9218-8578
Yee, Daryl W.0000-0002-4114-6167
Greer, Julia R.0000-0002-9675-1508
Kochmann, Dennis M.0000-0002-9112-6615
Additional Information:© 2020 National Academy of Sciences. Published under the PNAS license. Edited by John W. Hutchinson, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, and approved February 6, 2020 (received for review September 26, 2019). PNAS first published March 4, 2020. We acknowledge financial support from Office of Naval Research Award N00014-16-1-2431. J.R.G. acknowledges support from the Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship. Data Availability: All data needed to evaluate the conclusions in this paper are available in the text or in SI Appendix. Author contributions: C.M.P., J.R.G., and D.M.K. designed research; C.M.P., A.V., S.K., T.W., and D.W.Y. performed research; C.M.P. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; C.M.P. and T.W. analyzed data; and C.M.P., J.R.G., and D.M.K. wrote the paper. The authors declare no competing interest. This article is a PNAS Direct Submission. This article contains supporting information online at https://www.pnas.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1073/pnas.1916817117/-/DCSupplemental.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Office of Naval Research (ONR)N00014-16-1-2431
Vannevar Bush FellowshipUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:self-assembly; metamaterial; damage tolerance; resilience ; anisotropy
Issue or Number:11
PubMed Central ID:PMC7084143
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20200304-130419102
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20200304-130419102
Official Citation:Extreme mechanical resilience of self-assembled nanolabyrinthine materials. Carlos M. Portela, A. Vidyasagar, Sebastian Krödel, Tamara Weissenbach, Daryl W. Yee, Julia R. Greer, Dennis M. Kochmann. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Mar 2020, 117 (11) 5686-5693; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1916817117
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:101712
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:04 Mar 2020 21:58
Last Modified:08 Jun 2020 18:04

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