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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Lowers Elevated Functional Connectivity in Depressed Adolescents

Chattopadhyay, Shayanti and Tait, Roger and Simas, Tiago and van Nieuwenhuizen, Adrienne and Hagan, Cindy C. and Holt, Rosemary J. and Graham, Julia and Sahakian, Barbara J. and Wilkinson, Paul O. and Goodyer, Ian M. and Suckling, John (2017) Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Lowers Elevated Functional Connectivity in Depressed Adolescents. EBioMedicine, 17 . pp. 216-222. ISSN 2352-3964. PMCID PMC5360581. doi:10.1016/j.ebiom.2017.02.010. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20200310-142734597

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Abstract

Imaging studies have implicated altered functional connectivity in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD). Whether similar dysfunction is present in adolescent patients is unclear. The degree of resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) may reflect abnormalities within emotional (‘hot’) and cognitive control (‘cold’) neural systems. Here, we investigate rsFC of these systems in adolescent patients and changes following cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) was acquired from adolescent patients before CBT, and 24-weeks later following completed therapy. Similar data were obtained from control participants. Cross-sectional Cohort: From 82 patients and 34 controls at baseline, rsFC of the amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and pre-frontal cortex (PFC) was calculated for comparison. Longitudinal Cohort: From 17 patients and 30 controls with longitudinal data, treatment effects were tested on rsFC. Patients demonstrated significantly greater rsFC to left amygdala, bilateral supragenual ACC, but not with PFC. Treatment effects were observed in right insula connected to left supragenual ACC, with baseline case-control differences reduced. rsFC changes were significantly correlated with changes in depression severity. Depressed adolescents exhibited heightened connectivity in regions of ‘hot’ emotional processing, known to be associated with depression, where treatment exposure exerted positive effects, without concomitant differences in areas of ‘cold’ cognition.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2017.02.010DOIArticle
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5360581/PubMed CentralArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Hagan, Cindy C.0000-0002-4576-7120
Additional Information:© 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Under a Creative Commons license (Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)). Received 13 January 2017, Revised 10 February 2017, Accepted 13 February 2017, Available online 16 February 2017. The study was funded by the UK Medical Research Council (grant: G0802226), the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) (grant: 06-05-01), financial support from the Department of Health, and the Behavioral and Clinical Neuroscience Institute (BCNI), University of Cambridge, the latter being jointly funded by the Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust. Additional support was received from the Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre. SC is supported by a Cambridge CONACyT scholarship from the University of Cambridge Overseas Trust and CONACyT. Special thanks go to all participants for their contribution to this work. We also greatly appreciate the role of the Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, Mental Health Research Network, IMPACT research assistants, and IMPACT clinicians, without whom this study could not have taken place. Funding Sources: UK Medical Research Council (MRC) (grant: G0802226), National Institute for Health Research (grant: 06-05-01), the Department of Health, Behavioral and Clinical Neuroscience Institute (University of Cambridge), the latter being jointly funded by the MRC and the Wellcome Trust. Additional support received from the Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre. SC is supported by the University of Cambridge Overseas Trust and CONACyT: Data collection and analyses. Conflicts of Interests: SC, RT, TS, AV, CCH, and RJH report no biomedical financial interests or potential conflicts of interests. JG reports grants from MRC during the conduct of the study. BJS reports personal fees from Cambridge Cognition, Peak (Brainbow), Mundipharma, Lundbeck, Otsuka, and grants from J&J, outside the submitted work. POW reports personal fees from Lundbeck and Takeda, and grants from MRC and CLAHRC-EoE, outside the submitted work, and is an interpersonal psychotherapy supervisor and trainer. IMG reports grants from NIHR-HTA, grants from Wellcome Trust Strategic Award, outside the submitted work. JS reports grants from MRC, National Institute for Health Research, Wellcome Trust or MRC, during the conduct of the study; grants from GlaxoSmithKline plc, personal fees from GlaxoSmithKline plc, outside the submitted work. Author Contributions: SC, JS, and AV drafted the manuscript, with further edits provided by RT, TS, CCH, RJH, JG, BJS, POW, and IMG. SC conducted the literature search and designed all figures. SC, RT, and TS conducted the analyses. AV, CCH, RJH, and JG were involved in data collection. POW, IMG, and JS designed the study.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Medical Research Council (MRC)G0802226
National Institute for Health Research06-05-01
Wellcome TrustUNSPECIFIED
Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT)UNSPECIFIED
University of CambridgeUNSPECIFIED
Cambridge Overseas TrustUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:Depression; Adolescence; Resting-state; Functional connectivity; Fronto-limbic; Cortical thickness
PubMed Central ID:PMC5360581
DOI:10.1016/j.ebiom.2017.02.010
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20200310-142734597
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20200310-142734597
Official Citation:Shayanti Chattopadhyay, Roger Tait, Tiago Simas, Adrienne van Nieuwenhuizen, Cindy C. Hagan, Rosemary J. Holt, Julia Graham, Barbara J. Sahakian, Paul O. Wilkinson, Ian M. Goodyer, John Suckling, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Lowers Elevated Functional Connectivity in Depressed Adolescents, EBioMedicine, Volume 17, 2017, Pages 216-222, ISSN 2352-3964, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2017.02.010.
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:101833
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: George Porter
Deposited On:10 Mar 2020 21:49
Last Modified:16 Nov 2021 18:06

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