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Change in Motor Plan, Without a Change in the Spatial Locus of Attention, Modulates Activity in Posterior Parietal Cortex

Snyder, Lawrence H. and Batista, Aaron P. and Andersen, Richard A. (1998) Change in Motor Plan, Without a Change in the Spatial Locus of Attention, Modulates Activity in Posterior Parietal Cortex. Journal of Neurophysiology, 79 (5). pp. 2814-2819. ISSN 0022-3077. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20200402-121652675

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Abstract

Change in motor plan, without a change in the spatial locus of attention, modulates activity in posterior parietal cortex. J. Neurophysiol. 79: 2814–2819, 1998. The lateral intraparietal area (LIP) of macaque monkey, and a parietal reach region (PRR) medial and posterior to LIP, code the intention to make visually guided eye and arm movements, respectively. We studied the effect of changing the motor plan, without changing the locus of attention, on single neurons in these two areas. A central target was fixated while one or two sequential flashes occurred in the periphery. The first appeared either within the response field of the neuron being recorded or else on the opposite side of the fixation point. Animals planned a saccade (red flash) or reach (green flash) to the flash location. In some trials, a second flash 750 ms later could change the motor plan but never shifted attention: second flashes always occurred at the same location as the preceding first flash. Responses in LIP were larger when a saccade was instructed (n = 20 cells), whereas responses in PRR were larger when a reach was instructed (n = 17). This motor preference was observed for both first flashes and second flashes. In addition, the response to a second flash depended on whether it affirmed or countermanded the first flash; second flash responses were diminished only in the former case. Control experiments indicated that this differential effect was not due to stimulus novelty. These findings support a role for posterior parietal cortex in coding specific motor intention and are consistent with a possible role in the nonspatial shifting of motor intention.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.1998.79.5.2814DOIArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Andersen, Richard A.0000-0002-7947-0472
Additional Information:© 1998 American Physiological Society. Received 18 June 1997; Accepted 26 January 1998; Published online 1 May 1998; Published in print 1 May 1998. We thank B. Gillikan for technical assistance and S. Gertmenian for editorial assistance. This work was sponsored by the National Eye Institute Grant EY-05522, the Della Martin Foundation, and the Sloan Center for Theoretical Neurobiology.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NIHEY-05522
Della Martin FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Sloan-Swartz Center for Theoretical NeurobiologyUNSPECIFIED
Issue or Number:5
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20200402-121652675
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20200402-121652675
Official Citation:Change in Motor Plan, Without a Change in the Spatial Locus of Attention, Modulates Activity in Posterior Parietal Cortex. Lawrence H. Snyder, Aaron P. Batista, and Richard A. Andersen. Journal of Neurophysiology 1998 79:5, 2814-2819; doi: 10.1152/jn.1998.79.5.2814
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:102268
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:02 Apr 2020 19:36
Last Modified:02 Apr 2020 19:36

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