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Compensatory Proliferation Induced by Cell Death in the Drosophila Wing Disc Requires Activity of the Apical Cell Death Caspase Dronc in a Nonapoptotic Role

Huh, Jun R. and Guo, Ming and Hay, Bruce A. (2004) Compensatory Proliferation Induced by Cell Death in the Drosophila Wing Disc Requires Activity of the Apical Cell Death Caspase Dronc in a Nonapoptotic Role. Current Biology, 14 (14). pp. 1262-1266. ISSN 0960-9822. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2004.06.015. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20200427-150136320

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Abstract

Achieving proper organ size requires a balance between proliferation and cell death. For example, at least 40%–60% of cells in the Drosophila wing disc can be lost, yet these discs go on to give rise to normal-looking adult wings as a result of compensatory proliferation 1, 2, 3. The signals that drive this proliferation are unknown. One intriguing possibility is that they derive, at least in part, from the dying cells. To explore this hypothesis, we activated cell death signaling in specific populations of cells in the developing wing but prevented these cells from dying through expression of the baculovirus p35 protein, which inhibits the activity of effector caspases that mediate apoptosis [4]. This allowed us to uncouple the activation steps of apoptosis from death itself. Here we report that stimulation of cell death signaling in the wing disc—in the absence of cell death—results in increased proliferation and ectopic expression of Wingless, a known mitogen in the wing. Activation of the apical cell death caspase Dronc is necessary and sufficient to drive both of these processes. Our results demonstrate an unanticipated function, the nonautonomous induction of proliferation, of an apical cell death caspase. This activity is likely to contribute to tissue homeostasis by promoting local compensatory proliferation in response to cell death. We speculate that dying cells may communicate cell fate or behavior instructions to their neighbors in other contexts as well.


Item Type:Article
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https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2004.06.015DOIArticle
Additional Information:© 2004 Elsevier Ltd. Received 5 May 2004, Revised 27 May 2004, Accepted 27 May 2004, Available online 26 July 2004. We thank Sharad Kumar, Helena Richardson, Stephen Crews, Andreas Bergmann, and Ennio Giordano for fly stocks and vectors, as well as Melvin Simon for use of his confocal microscope. The Wingless antibodies developed by Stephen M. Cohen were obtained from the Developmental Studies Hybridoma Bank developed under the auspices of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and maintained by the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Iowa, Iowa City.
Issue or Number:14
DOI:10.1016/j.cub.2004.06.015
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20200427-150136320
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20200427-150136320
Official Citation:Jun R Huh, Ming Guo, Bruce A Hay, Compensatory Proliferation Induced by Cell Death in the Drosophila Wing Disc Requires Activity of the Apical Cell Death Caspase Dronc in a Nonapoptotic Role, Current Biology, Volume 14, Issue 14, 2004, Pages 1262-1266, ISSN 0960-9822, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2004.06.015. (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982204004191)
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:102817
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:27 Apr 2020 22:32
Last Modified:16 Nov 2021 18:15

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