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Evidence for sodium-rich alkaline water in the Tagish Lake parent body and implications for amino acid synthesis and racemization

White, Lee F. and Tait, Kimberly T. and Langelier, Brian and Lymer, Elizabeth A. and Černok, Ana and Kizovski, Tanya V. and Ma, Chi and Tschauner, Oliver and Nicklin, Richard I. (2020) Evidence for sodium-rich alkaline water in the Tagish Lake parent body and implications for amino acid synthesis and racemization. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 117 (21). pp. 11217-11219. ISSN 0027-8424. PMCID PMC7260959. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20200512-103708444

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Abstract

Understanding the timing and mechanisms of amino acid synthesis and racemization on asteroidal parent bodies is key to demonstrating how amino acids evolved to be mostly left-handed in living organisms on Earth. It has been postulated that racemization can occur rapidly dependent on several factors, including the pH of the aqueous solution. Here, we conduct nanoscale geochemical analysis of a framboidal magnetite grain within the Tagish Lake carbonaceous chondrite to demonstrate that the interlocking crystal arrangement formed within a sodium-rich, alkaline fluid environment. Notably, we report on the discovery of Na-enriched subgrain boundaries and nanometer-scale Ca and Mg layers surrounding individual framboids. These interstitial coatings would yield a surface charge state of zero in more-alkaline fluids and prevent assimilation of the individual framboids into a single grain. This basic solution would support rapid synthesis and racemization rates on the order of years, suggesting that the low abundances of amino acids in Tagish Lake cannot be ascribed to fluid chemistry.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2003276117DOIArticle
https://www.pnas.org/content/suppl/2020/05/06/2003276117.DCSupplementalPublisherSupporting Information
https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/TJV8WDOIData
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmc7260959/PubMed CentralArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
White, Lee F.0000-0003-4471-8682
Tait, Kimberly T.0000-0001-5403-2727
Lymer, Elizabeth A.0000-0002-9465-5950
Černok, Ana0000-0002-9884-6535
Kizovski, Tanya V.0000-0001-8188-9769
Ma, Chi0000-0002-1828-7033
Tschauner, Oliver0000-0003-3364-8906
Nicklin, Richard I.0000-0002-4715-4416
Additional Information:© 2020 the Author(s). Published by PNAS. This open access article is distributed under Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CC BY). Edited by Lisa Tauxe, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, and approved April 13, 2020 (received for review February 27, 2020). PNAS first published May 11, 2020. We thank Louise Hawley Stone for the purchase of the Tagish Lake sample. K.T.T. acknowledges a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Discovery Grant and Canadian Space Agency funding, and L.F.W. and A.Č. thank Hatch for funding. T.V.K. acknowledges the Hatch University Graduate Fund and the support of NSERC Grant CGSD2-534938-2019. We acknowledge the facilities, and the scientific and technical assistance from the Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, a facility supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation under the Major Science Initiative program, NSERC, and McMaster University (also supported by other government agencies). Data Availability: Raw data files (.pos and .rrng) to support this study can be accessed through the associated Open Science Framework project (DOI 10.17605/OSF.IO/TJV8W). Author contributions: L.F.W., K.T.T., and R.I.N. designed research; L.F.W., B.L., A.Č., T.V.K., C.M., and O.T. performed research; L.F.W., B.L., E.A.L., A.Č., T.V.K., and O.T. analyzed data; and L.F.W. wrote the paper. The authors declare no competing interest. Data deposition: Raw data files (.pos and .rrng) to support this study can be accessed through the associated Open Science Framework project (DOI 10.17605/OSF.IO/TJV8W). This article contains supporting information online at https://www.pnas.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1073/pnas.2003276117/-/DCSupplemental.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)CGSD2-534938-2019
Canadian Space Agency (CSA)UNSPECIFIED
University of TorontoUNSPECIFIED
Canada Foundation for InnovationUNSPECIFIED
McMaster UniversityUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:Tagish Lake; framboidal magnetite; atom probe tomography; amino acid
Issue or Number:21
PubMed Central ID:PMC7260959
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20200512-103708444
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20200512-103708444
Official Citation:Evidence for sodium-rich alkaline water in the Tagish Lake parent body and implications for amino acid synthesis and racemization. Lee F. White, Kimberly T. Tait, Brian Langelier, Elizabeth A. Lymer, Ana Černok, Tanya V. Kizovski, Chi Ma, Oliver Tschauner, Richard I. Nicklin. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences May 2020, 117 (21) 11217-11219; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2003276117
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:103136
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:12 May 2020 18:34
Last Modified:10 Jun 2020 20:16

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