CaltechAUTHORS
  A Caltech Library Service

Mapping protein-DNA interactions in vivo with formaldehyde: Evidence that histone H4 is retained on a highly transcribed gene

Solomon, Mark J. and Larsen, Pamela L. and Varshavsky, Alexander (1988) Mapping protein-DNA interactions in vivo with formaldehyde: Evidence that histone H4 is retained on a highly transcribed gene. Cell, 53 (6). pp. 937-947. ISSN 0092-8674. doi:10.1016/s0092-8674(88)90469-2. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20210129-142403364

Full text is not posted in this repository. Consult Related URLs below.

Use this Persistent URL to link to this item: https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20210129-142403364

Abstract

We have used formaldehyde-mediated protein-DNA crosslinking within intact cells to examine the in vivo chromatin structure of the D. melanogaster heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) genes. In agreement with previous in vitro studies, we find that the heat shock-mediated transcriptional induction of the hsp70 genes perturbs their chromatin structure, resulting in fewer proteinDNA contacts crosslinkable in vivo by formaldehyde. However, contrary to earlier in vitro evidence that histones may be absent from actively transcribed genes, we show directly, by immunoprecipitation of in vivo-crosslinked chromatin fragments, that at least histone H4 remains bound to hsp70 DNA in vivo, irrespective of its rate of transcription. The formaldehyde-based in vivo mapping techniques described in this work are generally applicable, and can be used both to probe proteinDNA interactions within specific genes and to determine the genomic location of specific chromosomal proteins.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1016/s0092-8674(88)90469-2DOIArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Varshavsky, Alexander0000-0002-4011-258X
Additional Information:© 1988 Cell Press. Received 4 December 1987, Revised 17 March 1988. We are greatly indebted to David Stollar and Arno Greenleaf for the anti-H4 and anti-RNA polymerase sera, respectively We also thank Mary Lou Pardue and Karen Travers for DNA clones and SL-2 cells, Darnel Finley, Bonnie Bartel, John McGrath, and Edward Winter for comments on the manuscript; and Barbara Doran for secretarial assistance. This work was supported by grants to A. V from the National Institutes of Health (CA43309 and GM33401) M J S was supported by a predoctoral fellowship from the National Science Foundation P. L. L. was supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from the American Cancer Society. The costs of publication of this article were defrayed m part by the payment of page charges. This article must therefore be hereby marked "advertisement" in accordance with 18 U S.C Section 1734 solely to indicate this fact.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NIHCA43309
NIHGM33401
NSF Graduate Research FellowshipUNSPECIFIED
American Cancer SocietyUNSPECIFIED
Issue or Number:6
DOI:10.1016/s0092-8674(88)90469-2
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20210129-142403364
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20210129-142403364
Official Citation:Mark J. Solomon, Pamela L. Larsen, Alexander Varshavsky, Mapping protein-DNA interactions in vivo with formaldehyde: Evidence that histone H4 is retained on a highly transcribed gene, Cell, Volume 53, Issue 6, 1988, Pages 937-947, ISSN 0092-8674, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0092-8674(88)90469-2.
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:107824
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: George Porter
Deposited On:01 Feb 2021 15:14
Last Modified:16 Nov 2021 19:06

Repository Staff Only: item control page