CaltechAUTHORS
  A Caltech Library Service

Field experiments find no evidence that chimpanzee nut cracking can be independently innovated

Koops, Kathelijne and Soumah, Aly Gaspard and van Leeuwen, Kelly L. and Camara, Henry Didier and Matsuzawa, Tetsuro (2022) Field experiments find no evidence that chimpanzee nut cracking can be independently innovated. Nature Human Behaviour, 6 (4). pp. 487-494. ISSN 2397-3374. doi:10.1038/s41562-021-01272-9. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20220203-923323000

[img] PDF (Reporting Summary) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

53kB
[img] Video (MPEG) (Supplementary Video 1) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

62MB
[img] MS Excel (Supplementary Table 1) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

16kB
[img] MS Excel (Source Data Fig. 3) - Supplemental Material
See Usage Policy.

9kB

Use this Persistent URL to link to this item: https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20220203-923323000

Abstract

Cumulative culture has been claimed a hallmark of human evolution. Yet, the uniqueness of human culture is heavily debated. The zone of latent solutions hypothesis states that only humans have cultural forms that require form-copying social learning and are culture-dependent. Non-human ape cultural behaviours are considered ‘latent solutions’, which can be independently (re-)innovated. Others claim that chimpanzees, like humans, have cumulative culture. Here, we use field experiments at Seringbara (Nimba Mountains, Guinea) to test whether chimpanzee nut cracking can be individually (re-)innovated. We provided: (1) palm nuts and stones, (2) palm fruit bunch, (3) cracked palm nuts and (4) Coula nuts and stones. Chimpanzee parties visited (n = 35) and explored (n = 11) the experiments but no nut cracking occurred. In these experiments, chimpanzees did not individually (re-)innovate nut cracking under ecologically valid conditions. Our null results are consistent with the hypothesis that chimpanzee nut cracking is a product of social learning.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-021-01272-9DOIArticle
https://rdcu.be/cGjLUPublisherFree ReadCube access
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
van Leeuwen, Kelly L.0000-0003-4068-3929
Matsuzawa, Tetsuro0000-0002-8147-2725
Additional Information:© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited 2022. Received 20 July 2021; Accepted 07 December 2021; Published 24 January 2022. We thank the DGERSIT and the IREB in Guinea for research authorization; research assistants, K. Doré, F. Doré, F. Zogbila, N. Doré, D. Zogbila, Y. Zogbila, C. Samy, N. Gbouomy and M. O’Reilly for help in the field; and R. Lavooij for technical support. We thank R. Wrangham and S. Koski for helpful comments on the manuscript. Research was supported by grants from the Lucie Burgers Foundation for Comparative Behaviour Research (the Netherlands), Gates Cambridge Trust (Cambridge, UK), Homerton College and Newnham College (Cambridge, UK) to K.K. and by MEXT (grant nos. 12002009, 16002001, 20002001, 24000001 and 16H06283) to T.M. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish or preparation of the manuscript. Data availability: The data for this study are included in Supplementary Table 1. Source data are provided with this paper. Author Contributions: K.K. conceived of the study, designed and coordinated the study, collected data, analysed the data and wrote the manuscript. H.C. collected data and commented on the manuscript. A.G.S. participated in coordination of the study and commented on the manuscript. K.L. collected data and commented on the manuscript. T.M. participated in design of the study and commented on the manuscript. All authors gave final approval for publication and agree to be held accountable for the work performed therein. The authors declare no competing interests. Peer review information: Nature Human Behaviour thanks Ammie Kalan and the other, anonymous, reviewer(s) for their contribution to the peer review of this work.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Lucie Burgers Foundation for Comparative Behaviour ResearchUNSPECIFIED
Gates Cambridge TrustUNSPECIFIED
Homerton CollegeUNSPECIFIED
Newnham CollegeUNSPECIFIED
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)12002009
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)16002001
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)20002001
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)24000001
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)16H06283
Subject Keywords:Behavioural ecology; Biological anthropology
Issue or Number:4
DOI:10.1038/s41562-021-01272-9
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20220203-923323000
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20220203-923323000
Official Citation:Koops, K., Soumah, A.G., van Leeuwen, K.L. et al. Field experiments find no evidence that chimpanzee nut cracking can be independently innovated. Nat Hum Behav 6, 487–494 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-021-01272-9
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:113260
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:03 Feb 2022 21:22
Last Modified:25 Apr 2022 21:18

Repository Staff Only: item control page