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Detecting spontaneous deception in the brain

Feng, Yen-Ju and Hung, Shao-Min and Hsieh, Po-Jang (2022) Detecting spontaneous deception in the brain. Human Brain Mapping, 43 (10). pp. 3257-3269. ISSN 1065-9471. PMCID PMC9189038. doi:10.1002/hbm.25849. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20220329-619767844

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Abstract

Deception detection can be of great value during the juristic investigation. Although the neural signatures of deception have been widely documented, most prior studies were biased by difficulty levels. That is, deceptive behavior typically required more effort, making deception detection possibly effort detection. Furthermore, no study has examined the generalizability across instructed and spontaneous responses and across participants. To explore these issues, we used a dual-task paradigm, where the difficulty level was balanced between truth-telling and lying, and the instructed and spontaneous truth-telling and lying were collected independently. Using Multivoxel pattern analysis, we were able to decode truth-telling versus lying with a balanced difficulty level. Results showed that the angular gyrus (AG), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and postcentral gyrus could differentiate lying from truth-telling. Critically, linear classifiers trained to distinguish instructed truthful and deceptive responses could correctly differentiate spontaneous truthful and deceptive responses in AG and IFG with above-chance accuracy. In addition, with a leave-one-participant-out analysis, multivoxel neural patterns from AG could classify if the left-out participant was lying or not in a trial. These results indicate the commonality of neural responses subserved instructed and spontaneous deceptive behavior as well as the feasibility of cross-participant deception validation.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.25849DOIArticle
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmc9189038/PubMed CentralArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Feng, Yen-Ju0000-0002-7265-6709
Hung, Shao-Min0000-0002-8908-1497
Additional Information:© 2022 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping published by Wiley Periodicals LLC. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. Issue Online: 12 June 2022; Version of Record online: 28 March 2022; Manuscript accepted: 09 March 2022; Manuscript revised: 05 March 2022; Manuscript received: 11 January 2022. We are grateful for the research funding provided by the Ministry of Education (MOE), Yushan Young Scholar Program (NTU-109 V0202), Ministry of Science and Technology (109-2410-H-002-004-MY3), and National Taiwan University (110L9A00701). There are no conflicts of interest to report. DATA AVAILABILITY STATEMENT. The raw data and code used for data analysis are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Taiwan UniversityNTU-109 V0202
Ministry of Science and Technology (Taipei)109-2410-H-002-004-MY3
National Taiwan University110L9A00701
Subject Keywords:angular gyrus, deception detection, inferior frontal gyrus, lying, multivoxel pattern analysis
Issue or Number:10
PubMed Central ID:PMC9189038
DOI:10.1002/hbm.25849
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20220329-619767844
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20220329-619767844
Official Citation:Feng, Y.-J., Hung, S.-M., & Hsieh, P.-J. (2022). Detecting spontaneous deception in the brain. Human Brain Mapping, 43(10), 3257–3269. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.25849
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:114128
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: George Porter
Deposited On:29 Mar 2022 12:27
Last Modified:02 Aug 2022 21:45

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