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Diamond mirrors for high-power continuous-wave lasers

Atikian, Haig A. and Sinclair, Neil and Latawiec, Pawel and Xiong, Xiao and Meesala, Srujan and Gauthier, Scarlett and Wintz, Daniel and Randi, Joseph and Bernot, David and DeFrances, Sage and Thomas, Jeffrey and Roman, Michael and Durrant, Sean and Capasso, Federico and Lončar, Marko (2022) Diamond mirrors for high-power continuous-wave lasers. Nature Communications, 13 (1). Art. No. 2610. ISSN 2041-1723. PMCID PMC9095672. doi:10.1038/s41467-022-30335-2. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20220511-201605500

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Abstract

High-power continuous-wave (CW) lasers are used in a variety of areas including industry, medicine, communications, and defense. Yet, conventional optics, which are based on multi-layer coatings, are damaged when illuminated by high-power CW laser light, primarily due to thermal loading. This hampers the effectiveness, restricts the scope and utility, and raises the cost and complexity of high-power CW laser applications. Here we demonstrate monolithic and highly reflective mirrors that operate under high-power CW laser irradiation without damage. In contrast to conventional mirrors, ours are realized by etching nanostructures into the surface of single-crystal diamond, a material with exceptional optical and thermal properties. We measure reflectivities of greater than 98% and demonstrate damage-free operation using 10 kW of CW laser light at 1070 nm, focused to a spot of 750 μm diameter. In contrast, we observe damage to a conventional dielectric mirror when illuminated by the same beam. Our results initiate a new category of optics that operate under extreme conditions, which has potential to improve or create new applications of high-power lasers.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-022-30335-2DOIArticle
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9095672/PubMed CentralArticle
https://arxiv.org/abs/1909.06458arXivDiscussion Paper
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Xiong, Xiao0000-0002-7153-8081
Capasso, Federico0000-0003-4534-8249
Lončar, Marko0000-0002-5029-5017
Alternate Title:Diamond Mirror for High Power Lasers, Diamond Mirrors for High-Power Lasers
Additional Information:© The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Received 19 September 2021; Accepted 26 April 2022; Published 11 May 2022. This work was performed in part at the Center for Nanoscale Systems (CNS), a member of the National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure Network (NNCI), which is supported by the National Science Foundation under NSF award no. 1541959. CNS is part of Harvard University. Laser-induced damage threshold of the diamond mirror was assessed at the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory, Electro-Optics Center. This work was supported in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (MURI, grant FA9550-14-1-0389), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA, W31P4Q-15-1-0013), STC Center for Integrated Quantum Materials and NSF Grant No. DMR-1231319. N.S. further acknowledges support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and the AQT Intelligent Quantum Networks and Technologies (INQNET) research program. P.L. was supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE1144152. The authors thank Daniel Twitchen and Matt Markham from Element Six for their support with the diamond samples, and Michael Haas for software assistance. Data availability: The datasets generated and analysed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request. Contributions: H.A. and M.L. conceived the idea. H.A., X.X., and S.G. performed simulations. H.A. fabricated the mirrors. S.M. assisted with diamond preparation. H.A. and P.L. designed the experiment setup. H.A. performed optical characterizations. D.W. assisted with beam profile measurements. H.A. and N.S. analyzed and interpreted the data. J.R., D.B., S.D., J.T., M.R., and S.D. assisted with laser damage testing. H.A. and N.S. wrote the manuscript with the help of all co-authors. F.C. and M.L. supervised the project. Competing interests: H.A. and M.L are inventors on patent applications related to this work (U.S. No.: 10,727,072, date filed: May 2016, granted: Jul 2020) and (U.S. Application No.: 15/759,909, date filed: Sept 2016). The authors declare that they have no other competing interests. Peer review information: Nature Communications thanks Richard Mildren and the other anonymous reviewer(s) for their contribution to the peer review of this work. Peer review reports are available.
Group:INQNET
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSFECCS-1541959
Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR)FA9550-14-1-0389
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)W31P4Q-15-1-0013
NSFDMR-1231319
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)UNSPECIFIED
AQT Intelligent Quantum Networks and Technologies (INQNET)UNSPECIFIED
NSF Graduate Research FellowshipDGE-1144152
Subject Keywords:Optical properties of diamond; Integrated optics; Metamaterials; Micro-optics
Issue or Number:1
PubMed Central ID:PMC9095672
DOI:10.1038/s41467-022-30335-2
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20220511-201605500
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20220511-201605500
Official Citation:Atikian, H.A., Sinclair, N., Latawiec, P. et al. Diamond mirrors for high-power continuous-wave lasers. Nat Commun 13, 2610 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-022-30335-2
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:114692
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:11 May 2022 23:54
Last Modified:13 May 2022 16:08

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