CaltechAUTHORS
  A Caltech Library Service

The bivalent side of the nucleus accumbens

Levita, Liat and Hare, Todd A. and Voss, Henning U. and Glover, Gary and Ballon, Douglas J. and Casey, B. J. (2009) The bivalent side of the nucleus accumbens. NeuroImage, 44 (3). pp. 1178-1187. ISSN 1053-8119. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:LEVni09

[img] PDF
Restricted to Caltech community only
See Usage Policy.

1MB
[img] Image (JPEG) (Supplementary Fig. 1. Greater activation to the negative and positive auditory stimuli was observed in the greater part of the striatal complex.) - Supplemental Material
Restricted to Caltech community only
See Usage Policy.

266kB
[img] Image (JPEG) (Supplementary Fig. 2. Time course of the hemodynamic response on presentation of the different duration positive (p) stimuli) - Supplemental Material
Restricted to Caltech community only
See Usage Policy.

313kB
[img] MS Word ((31 K) Help with DOC files (Opens New Window) Supplementary Table 1. Main effect of valence (positive vs. negative).) - Supplemental Material
Restricted to Caltech community only
See Usage Policy.

31kB
[img] MS Word ((55 K) Help with DOC files (Opens New Window) Supplementary Table 2. Main effect of time (onset vs. offset).) - Supplemental Material
Restricted to Caltech community only
See Usage Policy.

55kB
[img] MS Word (Supplementary Table 3. Brain regions showing functional connectivity with right amygdala functional seed.) - Supplemental Material
Restricted to Caltech community only
See Usage Policy.

81kB

Use this Persistent URL to link to this item: https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:LEVni09

Abstract

An increasing body of evidence suggests that the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) is engaged in both incentive reward processes and in adaptive responses to conditioned and unconditioned aversive stimuli. Yet, it has been argued that NAcc activation to aversive stimuli may be a consequence of the rewarding effects of their termination, i.e., relief. To address this question we used fMRI to delineate brain response to the onset and offset of unpleasant and pleasant auditory stimuli in the absence of learning or motor response. Increased NAcc activity was seen for the onset of both pleasant and unpleasant stimuli. Our results support the expanded bivalent view of NAcc function and call for expansion of current models of NAcc function that are solely focused on reward.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2008.09.039DOIUNSPECIFIED
Additional Information:Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Inc. Received 6 June 2008; revised 10 September 2008; accepted 21 September 2008. Available online 11 October 2008. We would like to thank Bruce McCandliss and Jason Zevin for their thoughtful discussions about this work. This research was supported in part by the National Institute of Drug Abuse Grant R01 DA018879 (BJC), NIH P50 MH52196 and MH079513, the Mortimer D. Sackler family and Dewitt-Wallace Reader's Digest Foundation. Appendix A. Supplementary data: Supplementary data associated with this article can be found, in the online version, at doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2008.09.039.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Institute on Drug AbuseR01 DA018879
National Institutes of HealthP50 MH52196
National Institutes of HealthMH079513
Mortimer D. Sackler FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Dewitt-Wallace Reader's Digest FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Issue or Number:3
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:LEVni09
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:LEVni09
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:13182
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Archive Administrator
Deposited On:02 Feb 2009 21:56
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 00:35

Repository Staff Only: item control page