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Testing evidence of recent hydration state change in sulfates on Mars

Roach, L. H. and Mustard, J. F. and Murchie, S. L. and Bibring, J.-P. and Forget, F. and Lewis, K. W. and Aharonson, O. and Vincendon, M. and Bishop, J. L. (2009) Testing evidence of recent hydration state change in sulfates on Mars. Journal of Geophysical Research E, 114 . E00D02. ISSN 0148-0227. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20090804-153438646

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Abstract

The East Candor Interior Layered Deposit (ILD) has signatures of mono‐ and polyhydrated sulfate in alternating layers that give insight into the processes which formed these layered deposits and on the environmental conditions acting on them since then. We use orbital data to explore multiple hypotheses for how these deposits formed: (1) sulfate‐bearing ILDs experience hydration changes on seasonal to a few years timescales under current Mars environmental conditions; (2) the deposits experience hydration under recent Mars conditions but require the wetter climate of high obliquity; and (3) the kieserite could be an original or diagenetic part of a complex evaporite mineral assemblage. Modeled climatology shows recent Mars environmental conditions might pass between multiple sulfate fields. However, comparison of Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activité (OMEGA) and Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer (CRISM) observations of the same ILD do not show changes in hydration over 2 Mars years. Low temperatures might slow the kinetics of that transition; it is likely that more clement conditions during periods of high obliquity are needed to overcome mineral metastability and hydrate kieserite‐bearing deposits. We find the alternate model, that the deposit is a cyclic evaporite sequence of mono‐ and polyhydrated sulfates, also plausible but with an unexplained dearth of Fe sulfates.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2008JE003245DOIArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Lewis, K. W.0000-0003-3412-803X
Aharonson, O.0000-0001-9930-2495
Additional Information:© 2009 American Geophysical Union. Received 1 August 2008; accepted 13 January 2009; published 8 April 2009. We applaud the CRISM and OMEGA science and engineering teams for their dedication and hard work. We are grateful for valuable conversations with Tim Lowenstein. We would also like to thank Bethany Ehlmann, Alian Wang, and an anonymous reviewer for insightful comments.
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20090804-153438646
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20090804-153438646
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:14797
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:05 Aug 2009 22:18
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 00:52

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