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A wake-based correlate of swimming performance and foraging behavior in seven co-occurring jellyfish species

Dabiri, J. O. and Colin, S. P. and Katija, K. and Costello, J. H. (2010) A wake-based correlate of swimming performance and foraging behavior in seven co-occurring jellyfish species. Journal of Experimental Biology, 213 . pp. 1217-1225. ISSN 0022-0949. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20100412-080852786

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Abstract

It is generally accepted that animal–fluid interactions have shaped the evolution of animals that swim and fly. However, the functional ecological advantages associated with those adaptations are currently difficult to predict on the basis of measurements of the animal–fluid interactions. We report the identification of a robust, fluid dynamic correlate of distinct ecological functions in seven jellyfish species that represent a broad range of morphologies and foraging modes. Since the comparative study is based on properties of the vortex wake – specifically, a fluid dynamical concept called optimal vortex formation – and not on details of animal morphology or phylogeny, we propose that higher organisms can also be understood in terms of these fluid dynamic organizing principles. This enables a quantitative, physically based understanding of how alterations in the fluid dynamics of aquatic and aerial animals throughout their evolution can result in distinct ecological functions.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jeb.034660 DOIUNSPECIFIED
http://jeb.biologists.org/cgi/content/abstract/213/8/1217PublisherUNSPECIFIED
Additional Information:© 2010. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd. Accepted 15 December 2009. First published online March 26, 2010. The authors gratefully acknowledge helpful suggestions from the reviewers and funding from the National Science Foundation (OCE-0727587 and OCE-0623508 to J.H.C.; OCE-0351398 and OCE-0623534 to S.P.C.; OCE-0623475 to J.O.D.) and the Office of Naval Research (N000140810654 and N000140810918).
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSFOCE-0727587
NSFOCE-0623508
NSFOCE-0351398
NSFOCE-0623534
NSFOCE-0623475
Office of Naval ResearchN000140810654
Office of Naval ResearchN000140810918
Subject Keywords:jellyfish, swimming, vortex formation, wakes.
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20100412-080852786
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20100412-080852786
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:17922
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:30 Apr 2010 03:51
Last Modified:26 Mar 2014 03:37

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