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Differences in transcription between free-living and CO_2-activated third-stage larvae of Haemonchus contortus

Cantacessi, Cinzia and Campbell, Bronwyn E. and Young, Neil D. and Jex, Aaron R. and Hall, Ross S. and Presidente, Paul J. A. and Zawadzki, Jodi L. and Zhong, Weiwei and Aleman-Meza, Boanerges and Loukas, Alex and Sternberg, Paul W. and Gasser, Robin B. (2010) Differences in transcription between free-living and CO_2-activated third-stage larvae of Haemonchus contortus. BMC Genomics, 11 . pp. 266-279. ISSN 1471-2164. PMCID PMC2880303. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20100624-080447987

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Abstract

Background: The disease caused by Haemonchus contortus, a blood-feeding nematode of small ruminants, is of major economic importance worldwide. The infective third-stage larva (L3) of this gastric nematode is enclosed in a cuticle (sheath) and, once ingested with herbage by the host, undergoes an exsheathment process that marks the transition from the free-living (L3) to the parasitic (xL3) stage. This study explored changes in gene transcription associated with this transition and predicted, based on comparative analysis, functional roles for key transcripts in the metabolic pathways linked to larval development. Results: Totals of 101,305 (L3) and 105,553 (xL3) expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were determined using 454 sequencing technology, and then assembled and annotated; the most abundant transcripts encoded transthyretin-like, calcium-binding EF-hand, NAD(P)-binding and nucleotide-binding proteins as well as homologues of Ancylostoma-secreted proteins (ASPs). Using an in silico-subtractive analysis, 560 and 685 sequences were shown to be uniquely represented in the L3 and xL3 stages, respectively; the transcripts encoded ribosomal proteins, collagens and elongation factors (in L3), and mainly peptidases and other enzymes of amino acid catabolism (in xL3). Caenorhabditis elegans orthologues of transcripts that were uniquely transcribed in each L3 and xL3 were predicted to interact with a total of 535 other genes, all of which were involved in embryonic development. Conclusion: The present study indicated that some key transcriptional alterations taking place during the transition from the L3 to the xL3 stage of H. contortus involve genes predicted to be linked to the development of neuronal tissue (L3 and xL3), formation of the cuticle (L3) and digestion of host haemoglobin (xL3). Future efforts using next-generation sequencing and bioinformatic technologies should provide the efficiency and depth of coverage required for the determination of the complete transcriptomes of different developmental stages and/or tissues of H. contortus as well as the genome of this important parasitic nematode. Such advances should lead to a significantly improved understanding of the molecular biology of H. contortus and, from an applied perspective, to novel methods of intervention.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2164-11-266DOIArticle
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2880303/PubMed CentralArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Sternberg, Paul W.0000-0002-7699-0173
Additional Information:© 2010 Cantacessi et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Received: 15 December 2009. Accepted: 27 April 2010. Published: 27 April 2010. This work was supported by grants from the Australian Research Council (RBG, AL, PWS) and the Australian-American Fulbright Commission (RBG). CC is the grateful recipient of International Postgraduate Research Scholarship (IPRS) from the Australian Government and a fee-remission scholarship through the University of Melbourne as well as the Clunies Ross (2008) and Sue Newton (2009) awards from the School of Veterinary Science of the same university. The staff of WormBase is acknowledged for their contributions. This article is dedicated to the late Paul JA Presidente. Authors' contributions: CC performed the bioinformatic analyses, analysed the results and drafted the manuscript, BEC, NDY, ARJ and RSH also participated in the bioinformatic analyses, PJAP and JLZ provided the parasite material, WZ and BAM assisted in the probabilistic genetic interaction network predictions, AL and PWS contributed to the drafting of the manuscript. RBG conceived and designed the study, coordinated and supervised the project and drafted the manuscript with CC. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Australian Research CouncilUNSPECIFIED
Australian-American Fulbright CommissionUNSPECIFIED
PubMed Central ID:PMC2880303
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20100624-080447987
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20100624-080447987
Official Citation:Cantacessi et al., Differences in transcription between free-living and CO2-activated third-stage larvae of Haemonchus contortus BMC Genomics 2010, 11:266
Usage Policy:This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
ID Code:18785
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:02 Aug 2010 22:20
Last Modified:09 May 2019 22:43

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