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D/H ratios of fatty acids from marine particulate organic matter in the California Borderland Basins

Jones, Ashley A. and Sessions, Alex L. and Campbell, Brian J. and Li, Chao and Valentine, David L. (2008) D/H ratios of fatty acids from marine particulate organic matter in the California Borderland Basins. Organic Geochemistry, 39 (5). pp. 485-500. ISSN 0146-6380. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20100708-075607498

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Abstract

We report the molecular and hydrogen–isotopic compositions of fatty acids extracted from suspended particulate organic matter (POM) and surface sediments at three stations off the southern California coast: Santa Barbara Basin, Santa Monica Basin, and the Gulf of Santa Catalina. Values of δD for individual fatty acids ranged from −237‰ to −73‰ in POM and from −216‰ to −124‰ in sediments. For most fatty acids, there are no significant differences in δD between sampling locations, with depth at each location, or between POM and sediments. Two fatty acids of likely bacterial origin (i-15:0, 15:0) are strongly D enriched in all samples, while a third (cyc-17:0) is not. The origins of that enrichment are uncertain, and could reflect either an anomalous D/H fractionation in certain marine bacteria, or a significant terrestrial source for those fatty acids, or both. In surface POM and sediments, even carbon numbered fatty acids become slightly D enriched as chain length increases. This isotopic ordering is similar to that observed in living organisms, and is presumably biosynthetic in origin. In contrast, all POM samples from below the mixed layer show a consistent pattern of D depletion with increasing chain length. The order of D enrichment in these fatty acids is well correlated with their solubility, and may be caused by fractionations accompanying dissolution or degradation by microbes.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.orggeochem.2007.11.001 DOIArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Sessions, Alex L.0000-0001-6120-2763
Additional Information:© 2007 Elsevier Ltd. Received 14 February 2007; revised 26 October 2007; accepted 4 November 2007. Available online 9 November 2007. Associate Editor—Roger Summons. The authors acknowledge Captain Murray Stein and the crew of the R/V New Horizon for assistance collecting samples. Brandon Swan performed shipboard O_2 measurements. In situ pumps were kindly lent to us by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. John Hayes, Will Berelson, and Sam Arey provided helpful discussions. This research was funded by NSF Award EAR-0311824 to ALS and DLV.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSFEAR-0311824
Issue or Number:5
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20100708-075607498
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20100708-075607498
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:18940
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:09 Jul 2010 18:33
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 01:50

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