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Comparative jet wake structure and swimming performance of salps

Sutherland, Kelly R. and Madin, Laurence P. (2010) Comparative jet wake structure and swimming performance of salps. Journal of Experimental Biology, 213 (17). pp. 2967-2975. ISSN 0022-0949. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20100831-105907421

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Abstract

Salps are barrel-shaped marine invertebrates that swim by jet propulsion. Morphological variations among species and life-cycle stages are accompanied by differences in swimming mode. The goal of this investigation was to compare propulsive jet wakes and swimming performance variables among morphologically distinct salp species (Pegea confoederata, Weelia (Salpa) cylindrica, Cyclosalpa sp.) and relate swimming patterns to ecological function. Using a combination of in situ dye visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, we describe properties of the jet wake and swimming performance variables including thrust, drag and propulsive efficiency. Locomotion by all species investigated was achieved via vortex ring propulsion. The slow-swimming P. confoederata produced the highest weight-specific thrust (T =53 N kg^(–1)) and swam with the highest wholecycle propulsive efficiency (η_wc= 55%). The fast-swimming W. cylindrica had the most streamlined body shape but produced an intermediate weight-specific thrust (T=30 N kg^(–1)) and swam with an intermediate whole-cycle propulsive efficiency (η_wc =52%). Weak swimming performance variables in the slow-swimming C. affinis, including the lowest weight-specific thrust (T=25 N kg^(–1)) and lowest whole-cycle propulsive efficiency (η_wc=47%), may be compensated by low energetic requirements. Swimming performance variables are considered in the context of ecological roles and evolutionary relationships.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jeb.041962 DOIUNSPECIFIED
http://jeb.biologists.org/cgi/content/abstract/213/17/2967PublisherUNSPECIFIED
Additional Information:© 2010 Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd. Accepted 20 May 2010. We gratefully acknowledge the people who facilitated our work at the Liquid Jungle Lab including Luis Camilli and Ellen Bailey. Dan Martin, David Kushner, Andrew Gray, Emily Abbott, Alex Techet and David Sutherland helped with SCUBA work. Erik Anderson and Alex Techet provided useful suggestions in analyzing data and interpreting results. The comments of two anonymous reviewers improved the quality of the manuscript. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation (OCE-0647723) and a Journal of Experimental Biology traveling fellowship.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSFOCE-0647723
Journal of Experimental Biology traveling fellowshipUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:jet wakes; swimming; pelagic tunicate; propulsive efficiency
Issue or Number:17
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20100831-105907421
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20100831-105907421
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:19738
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:01 Sep 2010 18:32
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 02:01

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