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Neural signatures of strategic types in a two-person bargaining game

Bhatt, Meghana A. and Lohrenz, Terry and Camerer, Colin F. and Montague, P. Read (2010) Neural signatures of strategic types in a two-person bargaining game. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107 (46). pp. 19720-19725. ISSN 0027-8424. PMCID PMC2993362. doi:10.1073/pnas.1009625107. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20101213-151512465

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Abstract

The management and manipulation of our own social image in the minds of others requires difficult and poorly understood computations. One computation useful in social image management is strategic deception: our ability and willingness to manipulate other people's beliefs about ourselves for gain. We used an interpersonal bargaining game to probe the capacity of players to manage their partner's beliefs about them. This probe parsed the group of subjects into three behavioral types according to their revealed level of strategic deception; these types were also distinguished by neural data measured during the game. The most deceptive subjects emitted behavioral signals that mimicked a more benign behavioral type, and their brains showed differential activation in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and left Brodmann area 10 at the time of this deception. In addition, strategic types showed a significant correlation between activation in the right temporoparietal junction and expected payoff that was absent in the other groups. The neurobehavioral types identified by the game raise the possibility of identifying quantitative biomarkers for the capacity to manipulate and maintain a social image in another person's mind.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1009625107 DOIArticle
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2993362/PubMed CentralArticle
http://www.pnas.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1073/pnas.1009625107/-/DCSupplementalPublisherSupporting Information
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Lohrenz, Terry0000-0002-1581-0765
Camerer, Colin F.0000-0003-4049-1871
Montague, P. Read0000-0002-8967-0339
Additional Information:© 2010 by the National Academy of Sciences. Freely available online through the PNAS open access option. Edited by Terrence J. Sejnowski, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, and approved September 28, 2010 (received for review July 6, 2010). Published online before print November 1, 2010. Author contributions: M.A.B., C.F.C., and P.R.M. designed research; M.A.B. and T.L. performed research; P.R.M. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; M.A.B. and T.L. analyzed data; and M.A.B., T.L., C.F.C., and P.R.M. wrote the paper.
Subject Keywords:decision making; individual differences; neuroeconomics
Issue or Number:46
PubMed Central ID:PMC2993362
DOI:10.1073/pnas.1009625107
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20101213-151512465
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20101213-151512465
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:21336
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:14 Dec 2010 20:16
Last Modified:09 Nov 2021 00:07

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