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Engineering entropy-driven reactions and networks catalyzed by DNA

Zhang, David Yu and Turberfield, Andrew J. and Yurke, Bernard and Winfree, Erik (2007) Engineering entropy-driven reactions and networks catalyzed by DNA. Science, 318 (5853). pp. 1121-1125. ISSN 0036-8075. doi:10.1126/science.1148532. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20110309-104159433

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Abstract

Artificial biochemical circuits are likely to play as large a role in biological engineering as electrical circuits have played in the engineering of electromechanical devices. Toward that end, nucleic acids provide a designable substrate for the regulation of biochemical reactions. However, it has been difficult to incorporate signal amplification components. We introduce a design strategy that allows a specified input oligonucleotide to catalyze the release of a specified output oligonucleotide, which in turn can serve as a catalyst for other reactions. This reaction, which is driven forward by the configurational entropy of the released molecule, provides an amplifying circuit element that is simple, fast, modular, composable, and robust. We have constructed and characterized several circuits that amplify nucleic acid signals, including a feedforward cascade with quadratic kinetics and a positive feedback circuit with exponential growth kinetics.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1148532 DOIArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Yurke, Bernard0000-0003-3913-2855
Winfree, Erik0000-0002-5899-7523
Additional Information:© 2007 American Association for the Advancement of Science. Received for publication 30 July 2007. Accepted for publication 8 October 2007. We thank X. R. Bao, G. Seelig, D. Soloveichik, P. Rothemund, and L. Adleman for insightful discussions. There is a patent pending on this work. D.Y.Z. and A.J.T. were supported by UK research councils (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Medical Research Council, and the Ministry of Defense) though the Bionanotechnology Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration. D.Y.Z. and E.W. were supported by a Caltech Grubstake Grant and NSF grants 0506468, 0622254, and 0533064. D.Y.Z. is supported by the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)UNSPECIFIED
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)UNSPECIFIED
Medical Research Council (UK)UNSPECIFIED
Ministry of Defense (UK)UNSPECIFIED
Bionanotechnology Interdisciplinary Research CollaborationUNSPECIFIED
Caltech Grubstake GrantUNSPECIFIED
NSFDMS-0506468
NSFCCF-0622254
NSFCHE-0533064
Fannie and John Hertz FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Issue or Number:5853
DOI:10.1126/science.1148532
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20110309-104159433
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20110309-104159433
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:22746
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Lucinda Acosta
Deposited On:20 Oct 2011 20:24
Last Modified:09 Nov 2021 16:07

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