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An Asymptotic Analysis of Differential Electrical Mobility Classifiers

Downard, Andrew J. and Dama, James F. and Flagan, Richard C. (2011) An Asymptotic Analysis of Differential Electrical Mobility Classifiers. Aerosol Science and Technology, 45 (6). pp. 717-729. ISSN 0278-6826. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20110322-091238133

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Abstract

An asymptotic analysis of balanced flow operations of differential mobility analyzers (DMAs) and a new class of instruments that includes opposed migration aerosol classifiers (OMACs) and inclined grid mobility analyzers (IGMAs) provides new insights into the similarities and differences between the devices. The characteristic scalings of different instruments found from minimal models are shown to relate the resolving powers, dynamic ranges, and efficiencies of most such devices. The resolving powers of all of the instruments in the nondiffusive regime of high voltage classifications, R_(nd), is determined by the ratio of the flow rate of the separation gas (sheath or crossflow) to that of the aerosol. At lowvoltage,when diffusion degrades the classification, the OMAC and the IGMA share an R_(nd) factor advantage in dynamic range of mobilities over the DMA, although the OMAC also suffers greater losses because diffusion immediately deposits particles onto its porous electrodes. On the basis of this analysis, a single master operating diagram is proposed for DMAs, OMACs, and IGMAs. Analysis of this operating diagram and its consequences for the design of differential electrical mobility classifiers suggests that OMACs and IGMAs also have advantages over DMAs in design flexibility and miniaturization. Most importantly, OMACs and IGMAs may outperform DMAs for the currently difficult classification of particles with diameters less than 10 nm. On the other hand, DMAs are more amenable to voltage scanning-mode operation to enable accelerated size distribution measurements, whereas it is most convenient to operate OMACs and IGMAs in voltage stepping-mode operation.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02786826.2011.558136 DOIArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Flagan, Richard C.0000-0001-5690-770X
Additional Information:© 2011 American Association for Aerosol Research. Received 2 July 2010; accepted 20 January 2011. The authors gratefully acknowledge many helpful discussions with Ken Pickar. This work has been supported by the Jacobs Institute for Molecular Engineering for Medicine.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Jacobs Institute for Molecular Engineering for MedicineUNSPECIFIED
Issue or Number:6
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20110322-091238133
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20110322-091238133
Official Citation:An Asymptotic Analysis of Differential Electrical Mobility Classifiers Andrew J. Downard; James F. Dama; Richard C. Flagan Pages 717 – 729
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:23035
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Ruth Sustaita
Deposited On:22 Mar 2011 21:24
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 02:42

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