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Images of the Vega Dust Ring at 350 and 450 μm: New Clues to the Trapping of Multiple-Sized Dust Particles in Planetary Resonances

Marsh, K. A. and Dowell, C. D. and Velusamy, T. and Grogan, K. and Beichman, C. A. (2006) Images of the Vega Dust Ring at 350 and 450 μm: New Clues to the Trapping of Multiple-Sized Dust Particles in Planetary Resonances. Astrophysical Journal Letters, 646 (1). L77-L80. ISSN 2041-8205. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20110602-105332046

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Abstract

We have used the SHARC II camera at Caltech Submillimeter Observatory to make 350 and 450 μm images of the Vega dust disk at spatial resolutions (FWHM) of 9".7 and 11".1, respectively. The images show a ringlike morphology (radius ~100 AU) with inhomogeneous structure that is qualitatively different from that previously reported at 850 μm and longer wavelengths. We attribute the 350/450 μm emission to a grain population whose characteristic size (~1 mm) is intermediate between that of the centimeter-sized grains responsible for emission longward of 850 μm and the much smaller grains (≲18 μm) in the extensive halo, visible at 70 μm, discussed by Su et al. We have combined our submillimeter images with Spitzer data at 70 μm to produce two-dimensional maps of line-of-sight optical depth (relative column density). These "tau maps" suggest that the millimeter-sized grains are located preferentially in three symmetrically located concentrations. If so, then this structure could be understood in terms of the Wyatt model in which planetesimals are trapped in the mean motion resonances of a Neptune-mass planet at 65 AU, provided allowance is made for the spatial distribution of dust grains to differ from that of the parent planetesimals. The peaks of the tau maps are, in fact, located near the expected positions corresponding to the 4 : 3 resonance. If this identification is confirmed by future observations, it would resolve an ambiguity with regard to the location of the planet.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/506520DOIUNSPECIFIED
http://iopscience.iop.org/1538-4357/646/1/L77PublisherUNSPECIFIED
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Marsh, K. A.0000-0003-0107-7803
Beichman, C. A.0000-0002-5627-5471
Additional Information:© 2006 American Astronomical Society. Received 2006 March 6; accepted 2006 June 7; published 2006 July 12. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Research at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory is supported by NSF grant AST 02-29008.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSFAST 02-29008
Subject Keywords:circumstellar matter; planetary systems; stars: individual (Vega)
Issue or Number:1
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20110602-105332046
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20110602-105332046
Official Citation:Images of the Vega Dust Ring at 350 and 450 μm: New Clues to the Trapping of Multiple-Sized Dust Particles in Planetary Resonances K. A. Marsh et al 2006 ApJ 646 L77
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:23872
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Jason Perez
Deposited On:02 Jun 2011 22:57
Last Modified:09 Mar 2020 13:19

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