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Emotion, Cognition, and Belief Findings From Cognitive Neuroscience

Spezio, Michael L. and Adolphs, Ralph (2010) Emotion, Cognition, and Belief Findings From Cognitive Neuroscience. In: Delusion and self-deception: affective and motivational influences on belief formation. Macquarie Monographs in Cognitive Science . Psychology Press , New York, pp. 87-105. ISBN 978-1-84169-470-2 . https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20110607-093533779

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Abstract

Emotion and cognition are increasingly viewed as something other than caricatured competitors in judgment, and there is considerable evidence now that both are required for the formation of states like beliefs. This change is due in part to an impressive research program producing finding after finding implicating emotion in the formation of beliefs: beliefs about other people, beliefs about risk and reward, and even beliefs about moral goods (Adolphs, 2003a; Bar-On, Tranel, Denburg, & Bechara, 2003; Bedlara, Damasio, & Damasio, 2000; Forgas, 1995; Greene, 2003; Innes-Ker & Niedenthal, 2002; Lazarus, 1991a; Smith, Haynes, Lazarus, & Pope, 1993; Zajonc, 1980). One initial reaction might be to take emotion and cognition as contributing towards two separate aspects of belief: Roughly, that emotion makes us believe in anything in the first place and that cognition provides the content of what it is that we believe. The conviction that Paris is the capital of France can be construed akin to an emotional feeling, whereas the content of the belief requires the representational and inferential machinery of cognition. Another way of putting it might be to say that cognition provides the reasons or justifications for our beliefs, whereas emotion makes us act on our beliefs. There is much to be said for this way of characterizing the contribution of emotion and cognition to belief, although as we will see in this chapter, matters are somewhat more complex.


Item Type:Book Section
Related URLs:
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http://www.psypress.com/delusion-and-selfdeception-9781841694702PublisherArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Adolphs, Ralph0000-0002-8053-9692
Additional Information:© 2010 Psychology Press. This research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, the Pfeiffer Research Foundation, and the Simons Foundation.
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Funding AgencyGrant Number
NIHUNSPECIFIED
National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and DepressionUNSPECIFIED
Pfeiffer Research FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Simons FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Series Name:Macquarie Monographs in Cognitive Science
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20110607-093533779
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20110607-093533779
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:23925
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:09 Jun 2011 17:50
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 02:51

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