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Evaluation of the seismic performance of a code-conforming reinforced-concrete frame building—from seismic hazard to collapse safety and economic losses

Goulet, Christine A. and Haselton, Curt B. and Mitrani-Reiser, Judith and Beck, James L. and Deierlein, Gregory G. and Porter, Keith A. and Stewart, Jonathan P. (2007) Evaluation of the seismic performance of a code-conforming reinforced-concrete frame building—from seismic hazard to collapse safety and economic losses. Earthquake Engineering and Structural Dynamics, 36 (13). pp. 1973-1997. ISSN 0098-8847. doi:10.1002/eqe.694. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20120810-120608781

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Abstract

A state-of-the-art seismic performance assessment is illustrated through application to a reinforcedconcrete moment-frame building designed per current (2003) building code provisions. Performance is quantified in terms of economic losses and collapse safety. The assessment includes site-specific seismic hazard analyses, nonlinear dynamic structural response simulations to collapse, damage analyses, and loss estimation. When selecting ground motion records for nonlinear dynamic analyses that are consistent with a target hazard level expressed in terms of a response spectral value at the building’s fundamental period, it is important to consider the response spectral shape, especially when considering higher hazard levels. This was done through the parameter commonly denoted by ε. Neglecting these effects during record selection is shown to lead to a factor of 5–10 overestimation of mean annual collapse rate. Structural response simulations, which properly account for uncertainties in ground motions and structural modelling, indicate a 2–7% probability of collapse for buildings subjected to motions scaled to a hazard level equivalent to a 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years. The probabilities of component damage and the means and coefficients of variation of the repair costs are calculated using fragility functions and repair-cost probability distributions. The calculated expected annual losses for various building design variants range from 0.6 to 1.1% of the replacement value, where the smaller losses are for above-code design variants and the larger losses are for buildings designed with minimum-code compliance. Sensitivity studies highlight the impact of key modelling assumptions on the accurate calculation of damage and the associated repair costs.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
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http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/eqe.694/abstractPublisherUNSPECIFIED
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eqe.694DOIUNSPECIFIED
Additional Information:Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Received 31 August 2006; Revised 31 January 2007; Accepted 22 March 2007. Contract/grant sponsor: Earthquake Engineering Research Centers Program of the National Science Foundation; contract/grant number: EEC-9701568. Contract/grant sponsor: National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Contract/grant sponsor: le Fonds québécois de la recherche sur la nature et les technologies. This work was supported primarily by the Earthquake Engineering Research Centers Program of the National Science Foundation, under award number EEC-9701568 through the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Science Foundation. Supplementary funding was also provided to Christine Goulet from the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and from le Fonds qu´eb´ecois de la recherche sur la nature et les technologies. The primary lead institutions for the seismic hazard analysis, the structural analysis, and the damage and loss analysis, in this PEER project are, respectively, the University of California at Los Angeles (J. Stewart (P.I.) and C. Goulet), Stanford University (G. Deierlein (P.I.) and C. Haselton) and the California Institute of Technology (J. Beck (P.I.), J. Mitrani-Reiser and K. Porter). The authors would also like to acknowledge the valuable input from Professors Helmut Krawinkler, Allin Cornell, Eduardo Miranda, Ertugrul Taciroglu and Jack Baker; architect and professional cost estimator, Gee Hecksher; graduate student Abbie Liel; and undergraduate interns Sarah Taylor Lange and Vivian Gonzales at Stanford and Caltech, respectively.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSFEEC-9701568
National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of CanadaUNSPECIFIED
le Fonds québécois de la recherche sur la nature et les technologiesUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:seismic; performance; assessment; building; epsilon; collapse; losses
Issue or Number:13
DOI:10.1002/eqe.694
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20120810-120608781
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20120810-120608781
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:33098
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Sydney Garstang
Deposited On:13 Aug 2012 20:53
Last Modified:09 Nov 2021 21:32

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