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Daily Scheduled High Fat Meals Moderately Entrain Behavioral Anticipatory Activity, Body Temperature, and Hypothalamic c-Fos Activation

Gallardo, Christian M. and Gunapala, Keith M. and King, Oliver D. and Steele, Andrew D. (2012) Daily Scheduled High Fat Meals Moderately Entrain Behavioral Anticipatory Activity, Body Temperature, and Hypothalamic c-Fos Activation. PLoS ONE, 7 (7). Art. No. e41161. ISSN 1932-6203. PMCID PMC3397999. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0041161. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20120820-094131316

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Abstract

When fed in restricted amounts, rodents show robust activity in the hours preceding expected meal delivery. This process, termed food anticipatory activity (FAA), is independent of the light-entrained clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, yet beyond this basic observation there is little agreement on the neuronal underpinnings of FAA. One complication in studying FAA using a calorie restriction model is that much of the brain is activated in response to this strong hunger signal. Thus, daily timed access to palatable meals in the presence of continuous access to standard chow has been employed as a model to study FAA in rats. In order to exploit the extensive genetic resources available in the murine system we extended this model to mice, which will anticipate rodent high fat diet but not chocolate or other sweet daily meals (Hsu, Patton, Mistlberger, and Steele; 2010, PLoS ONE e12903). In this study we test additional fatty meals, including peanut butter and cheese, both of which induced modest FAA. Measurement of core body temperature revealed a moderate preprandial increase in temperature in mice fed high fat diet but entrainment due to handling complicated interpretation of these results. Finally, we examined activation patterns of neurons by immunostaining for the immediate early gene c-Fos and observed a modest amount of entrainment of gene expression in the hypothalamus of mice fed a daily fatty palatable meal.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0041161DOIArticle
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3397999/PubMed CentralArticle
Additional Information:© 2012 Gallardo et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Received May 1, 2012; Accepted June 18, 2012; Published July 16, 2012. Funding was provided by the Broad Fellows Program in Brain Circuitry at Caltech, an Ellison Medical Foundation New Scholar Award, and a Grants Program in Eating Disorders Research from the Klarman Family Foundation to ADS. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. We thank Drs. Christof Koch, David Anderson, and Henry Lester for guidance and support. We thank Matthew Luby for helpful comments on the manuscript. Author Contributions: Conceived and designed the experiments: ADS CMG. Performed the experiments: ADS CMG KMG. Analyzed the data: ADS CMG ODK. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: ODK. Wrote the paper: CMG ADS.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Caltech Broad Fellows Program in Brain CircuitryUNSPECIFIED
Ellison Medical FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Klarman Family FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Issue or Number:7
PubMed Central ID:PMC3397999
DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0041161
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20120820-094131316
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20120820-094131316
Official Citation:Gallardo CM, Gunapala KM, King OD, Steele AD (2012) Daily Scheduled High Fat Meals Moderately Entrain Behavioral Anticipatory Activity, Body Temperature, and Hypothalamic c-Fos Activation. PLoS ONE 7(7): e41161. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0041161
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:33347
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Jason Perez
Deposited On:20 Aug 2012 20:15
Last Modified:09 Nov 2021 21:34

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