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Optimizing Cholinergic Tone Through Lynx Modulators of Nicotinic Receptors: Implications for Plasticity and Nicotine Addiction

Miwa, Julie M. and Lester, Henry A. and Walz, Andreas (2012) Optimizing Cholinergic Tone Through Lynx Modulators of Nicotinic Receptors: Implications for Plasticity and Nicotine Addiction. Physiology, 27 (4). pp. 187-199. ISSN 1548-9221. doi:10.1152/physiol.00002.2012. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20120924-131621260

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Abstract

The cholinergic system underlies both adaptive (learning and memory) and nonadaptive (addiction and dependency) behavioral changes through its ability to shape and regulate plasticity. Protein modulators such as lynx family members can fine tune the activity of the cholinergic system and contribute to the graded response of the cholinergic system, stabilizing neural circuitry through direct interaction with nicotinic receptors. Release of this molecular brake can unmask cholinergic-dependent mechanisms in the brain. Lynx proteins have the potential to provide top-down control over plasticity mechanisms, including addictive propensity. If this is indeed the case, then, what regulates the regulator? Transcriptional changes of lynx genes in response to pharmacological, physiological, and pathological alterations are explored in this review.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/physiol.00002.2012DOIArticle
http://physiologyonline.physiology.org/content/27/4/187PublisherArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Lester, Henry A.0000-0002-5470-5255
Additional Information:© 2012 International Union of the Physiological Sciences/American Physiological Society. We thank Sharon Grady and Rell L. Parker for helpful discussions and Pauline Ku and Wesley Chen for help with figures. This work was supported by funds from Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program of the University of California, Grant No. TRDRP19KT-0032 for J. M. Miwa; 5R43MH083416-02 and 1R43MH094004-01 for A. Walz; and R01 AG-033954-01 for H. A. Lester and J. M. Miwa. J. M. Miwa holds shares in Ophidion. A. Walz holds shares in Ophidion. Ophidion pursues the development of cognitive enhancement therapies related to the subject matter. Author contributions: J.M.M. analyzed data; J.M.M. interpreted results of experiments; J.M.M. and A.W. prepared figures; J.M.M. drafted manuscript; J.M.M., A.W., and H.A.L. edited and revised manuscript; J.M.M., A.W., and H.A.L. approved final version of manuscript.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
California Tobacco-Related Disease Research ProgramTRDRP19KT-0032
California Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program5R43MH083416-02
California Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program1R43MH094004-01
California Tobacco-Related Disease Research ProgramR01 AG-033954-01
Issue or Number:4
DOI:10.1152/physiol.00002.2012
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20120924-131621260
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20120924-131621260
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:34315
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Jason Perez
Deposited On:24 Sep 2012 21:24
Last Modified:09 Nov 2021 23:07

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