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Advanced Plasma Processing: Etching, Deposition, and Wafer Bonding Techniques for Semiconductor Applications

Shearn, Michael and Sun, Xiankai and Henry, M. David and Yariv, Amnon and Scherer, Axel (2010) Advanced Plasma Processing: Etching, Deposition, and Wafer Bonding Techniques for Semiconductor Applications. In: Semiconductor Technologies. InTech , pp. 79-104. ISBN 978-953-307-080-3. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20121119-082717239

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Abstract

Plasma processing techniques are one of the cornerstones of modern semiconductor fabrication. Low pressure plasmas in particular can achieve high radical density, high selectivity, and anisotropic etch profiles at low temperatures and mild voltages. This gentle processing environment prevents unwanted diffusion and degradation of materials due to heat and lattice damage from ion bombardment. Plasma treatments have a minimal effect on existing wafer structure, which is a key requirement for large scale integration schemes such as CMOS. In addition, recent progress in plasma-assisted wafer bonding has demonstrated low temperature, low pressure recipes utilizing O_2 plasma surface treatment for joining dissimilar semiconductor materials, such as silicon (Si) and indium phosphide (InP) (Fang et al., 2006).


Item Type:Book Section
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.5772/8564DOIUNSPECIFIED
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Henry, M. David0000-0002-5201-0644
Additional Information:© 2010 InTech — Open Access Company. Published online 01, April, 2010. Published in print edition April, 2010. Michael Shearn thanks the National Science Foundation for support under their Graduate Research Fellowship Program. M. David Henry gratefully acknowledges the John and Fannie Hertz Foundation for support. The authors acknowledge Andrew Homyk for his substantial work on silicon etching and Sameer Walavalkar who made substantial contributions on the alumina silicon etch mask work. Thanks also to the Kavli Nanoscience Institute at Caltech where much of the experimental work was done.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSF Graduate Research FellowshipUNSPECIFIED
John and Fannie Hertz FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Caltech Kavli Nanoscience Institute (KNI)UNSPECIFIED
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20121119-082717239
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20121119-082717239
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:35528
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:27 Nov 2012 22:05
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 04:29

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