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FlashBlades: System architecture and applications

Stalzer, Mark A. (2012) FlashBlades: System architecture and applications. In: Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Architectures and Systems for Big Data. Association for Computing Machinery , New York, NY, pp. 10-14. ISBN 978-1-4503-1444-2. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20130109-103801150

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Abstract

Presented is a speculative server blade architecture called a FlashBlade that combines 100x I/O performance in both latency and bandwidth with balanced computing. The blade consists of a standard multi-core CPU with attached DRAM. It uses a fast interconnect, such as Intel’s QuickPath, to communicate with a FPGA router called the X1. This router handles traffic to the C1 complexes and off-blade. Each C1 complex is a System on a Chip with Package on Package DRAM, connected to local flash memory. There are numerous complexes, giving tremendous I/O performance and computational balance. A large design space of parameters such as flash size, number of complexes, and link bandwidth between each C1 and the X1 is available for power and performance optimization. A single blade server constructed from these blades, just 12.25 inches high and drawing about 10 KW, could support a few hundred thousand basic web searches a second on 1 billion pages. It could also provide triple store performance 100x greater than achievable now for datasets of 6 TB and scales to petabyte datasets although at somewhat reduced performance; with numerous applications to defense, commerce, and science.


Item Type:Book Section
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2379436.2379438DOIArticle
http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=2379436.2379438PublisherArticle
Additional Information:© 2012 ACM. The author is grateful to Allan Cantle of Nallatech, Peter Feeley of Micron, John McCorquodale of Caltech, and Prasanna Sundararajan of Xilinx, for many useful discussions particularly related to the issues of viability. This work was supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DEFC52-08NA28613.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security AdministrationDE-FC52-08NA28613
Subject Keywords:Architecture, Computer Applications, Performance
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20130109-103801150
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20130109-103801150
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:36269
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:14 Jan 2013 23:03
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 04:36

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