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Martian clouds observed by Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera

Wang, Huiqun and Ingersoll, Andrew P. (2002) Martian clouds observed by Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera. Journal of Geophysical Research E, 107 (E10). Art. No. 5078. ISSN 0148-0227. doi:10.1029/2001JE001815. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20130417-110613527

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Abstract

We have made daily global maps that cover both polar and equatorial regions of Mars for Ls 135°–360° and 0°–111° using the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) red and blue wide-angle swaths taken from May 1999 to January 2001. We study the seasonal distribution of condensate clouds and dust clouds during roughly 1 Martian year using these daily global maps. We present the development and decay of the tropical cloud belt and the polar hoods, the spatial and temporal distributions of lee waves and spiral clouds, and an unusual “aster” cloud above the volcanoes, consisting of rays around a central disk, like the flower. The tropical cloud belt contains mostly fibrous clouds during northern spring/early summer and convective clouds during middle/late northern summer. The detailed development and decay of the tropical cloud belt is nonuniform in longitude. Two distinct stormy periods in late summer precede the formation of the north and south circumpolar hoods. The north polar storms in late summer resemble baroclinic frontal systems on Earth but contain both dust and condensate clouds. Spiral clouds occur only in the northern high latitudes and only during northern spring and summer. The north polar hood displays a stationary wave number two structure during the fall and winter. The south polar hood has fewer streak clouds and lee wave clouds than the north polar hood. During this particular year the lee wave cloud abundance in the south had two peaks (in early fall and late winter), and the lee wave cloud abundance in the north had one peak (in early fall).


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2001JE001815DOIArticle
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2001JE001815/abstractPublisherArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Ingersoll, Andrew P.0000-0002-2035-9198
Additional Information:© 2002 American Geophysical Union. Received 6 November 2001; revised 18 March 2002; accepted 22 April 2002; published 15 October 2002. This work is supported by the Mars Global Surveyor project and by NASA grant number NAG5-11288. We would like to thank the USGS astrogeology team for providing us with an early version of the software for calculating the geometry backplanes. We thank Shawn Ewald for testing the code for mosiacing the daily global maps. We thank Arden Albee, Zhiming Kuang, and an anonymous referee for helpful comments and suggestions.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NASANAG5-11288
Subject Keywords:Mars daily global map; Martian clouds; dust storm; spiral clouds; aster cloud
Issue or Number:E10
DOI:10.1029/2001JE001815
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20130417-110613527
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20130417-110613527
Official Citation:Wang, H., and A. P. Ingersoll, Martian clouds observed by Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera, J. Geophys. Res., 107(E10), 5078, doi:10.1029/2001JE001815, 2002.
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:37990
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Jason Perez
Deposited On:17 Apr 2013 19:47
Last Modified:09 Nov 2021 23:32

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