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Happy Faces Are Preferred Regardless of Familiarity—Sad Faces Are Preferred Only When Familiar

Liao, Hsin-I and Shimojo, Shinsuke and Yeh, Su-Ling (2013) Happy Faces Are Preferred Regardless of Familiarity—Sad Faces Are Preferred Only When Familiar. Emotion, 13 (3). pp. 391-396. ISSN 1528-3542. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20130719-104639542

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Abstract

Familiarity leads to preference (e.g., the mere exposure effect), yet it remains unknown whether it is objective familiarity, that is, repetitive exposure, or subjective familiarity that contributes to preference. In addition, it is unexplored whether and how different emotions influence familiarity-related preference. The authors investigated whether happy or sad faces are preferred or perceived as more familiar and whether this subjective familiarity judgment correlates with preference for different emotional faces. An emotional face—happy or sad—was paired with a neutral face, and participants rated the relative preference and familiarity of each of the paired faces. For preference judgment, happy faces were preferred and sad faces were less preferred, compared with neutral faces. For familiarity judgment, happy faces did not show any bias, but sad faces were perceived as less familiar than neutral faces. Item-by-item correlational analyses show preference for sad faces—but not happy faces—positively correlate with familiarity. These results suggest a direct link between positive emotion and preference, and argue at least partly against a common cause for familiarity and preference. Instead, facial expression of different emotional valence modulates the link between familiarity and preference.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0030861DOIArticle
http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/emo/13/3/391.htmlPublisherArticle
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23356560PubMed CentralUNSPECIFIED
Additional Information:© 2013 American Psychological Association. Received August 23, 2011; Revision received October 9, 2012; Accepted October 12, 2012. This article was published Online First January 28, 2013. This research was supported by Grant NSC 98-2410-H-002-023-MY3 to SY and Grant NSC 100-2811-H-002-024 to HL from Taiwan’s National Science Council. SS and HL have been supported by Japanese Science Technology Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology (ERATO) and Core Research for Evolutional Science & Technology (CREST).
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Taiwan National Science CouncilNSC 98-2410-H-002-023-MY3
Taiwan National Science CouncilNSC 100-2811-H-002-024
Japanese Science Technology Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology (ERATO)UNSPECIFIED
Core Research for Evolutional Science & Technology (CREST)UNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:preference, familiarity, emotion, happy, sad, face
Issue or Number:3
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20130719-104639542
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20130719-104639542
Official Citation:Liao, H.-I, Shimojo, S., & Yeh, S.-L. (2013). Happy faces are preferred regardless of familiarity—sad faces are preferred only when familiar. Emotion, 13(3), 391-396. doi:10.1037/a0030861
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:39467
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:12 Aug 2013 23:21
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 05:07

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