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Upward shallowing platform cycles: A response to 2.2 billion years of low-amplitude, high-frequency (Milankovitch band) sea level oscillations

Grotzinger, J. P. (1986) Upward shallowing platform cycles: A response to 2.2 billion years of low-amplitude, high-frequency (Milankovitch band) sea level oscillations. Paleoceanography, 1 (4). pp. 403-416. ISSN 0883-8305. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20131031-102832334

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Abstract

Shallow-water carbonate platforms, characterized by sequences of small-scale upward shallowing cycles, are common in the Phanerozoic and Proterozoic stratigraphic record. Proterozoic small-scale cycles are commonly 1 to 10 m thick, have asymmetrically arranged facies, and are strikingly similar to Phanerozoic platform cycles. In some platform sequences (eg. Rocknest, Wallace, and Helena formations of early to middle Proterozoic age), it can be demonstrated that the lateral distribution of facies within cycles relates to systematic variations in platform paleogeography and topography. In the Rocknest formation, cycles with intervals of tepees and pisolitic breccia formed on a topographic high (shoal complex) near the shelf edge rim, and provide evidence for eustatic falls in sea level at the end of each cycle. The presence of these facies in other Proterozoic cyclic platforms also suggests that eustatic sea level falls may have been important in the development of each cycle. Proterozoic upward shallowing cycles appear to have had periods of between 20,000 and 100,000 years, and probably formed during eustatic oscillations in sea level with amplitudes of less than 10 m. This suggests that cyclicity may have been regulated by Milankovitch band climatic forcing, perhaps influencing global sea level through minor changes related to small-scale continental or alpine glaciation. It is possible, then, that Milankovitch band climatic forcing has occurred for at least the last 2.2 billion years of earth history.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/PA001i004p00403 DOIArticle
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/PA001i004p00403/abstractUNSPECIFIEDArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Grotzinger, J. P.0000-0001-9324-1257
Additional Information:© 1996 American Geophysical Union. Received May 7, 1986; revised September 10, 1986; accepted September 10, 1986. This paper is a product of research done at the University of Montana, Virginia Tech, and Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, supported by the Geological Survey of Canada and National Science Foundation grant EAR-8218618. I have enjoyed discussions with J. F. Read, L. A. Hardie, R. Goldhammer, D. Winston, E. Anderson, P. Goodwin, B. Wilkinson, J. Imbrie, and P. Olsen concerning data and interpretations presented here.
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Geological Survey of Canada UNSPECIFIED
NSFEAR-8218618
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20131031-102832334
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20131031-102832334
Official Citation:Grotzinger, J. P. (1986), Upward shallowing platform cycles: A response to 2.2 billion years of low-amplitude, high-frequency (Milankovitch band) sea level oscillations, Paleoceanography, 1(4), 403–416, doi:10.1029/PA001i004p00403
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:42152
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:31 Oct 2013 21:46
Last Modified:26 Oct 2017 19:32

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