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Computer simulation of flagellar movement X: Doublet pair splitting and bend propagation modeled using stochastic dynein kinetics

Brokaw, Charles J. (2014) Computer simulation of flagellar movement X: Doublet pair splitting and bend propagation modeled using stochastic dynein kinetics. Cytoskeleton, 71 (4). pp. 273-284. ISSN 1949-3584. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20140515-130406127

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Abstract

Experimental observations on cyclic splitting and bending by a flagellar doublet pair are modeled using forces obtained from a model for dynein mechanochemistry, based on ideas introduced by Andrew Huxley and Terrill Hill and extended previously for modeling flagellar movements. The new feature is elastic attachment of dynein to the A doublet, which allows movement perpendicular to the A doublet and provides adhesive force that can strain attached dyneins. This additional strain influences the kinetics of dynein attachment and detachment. Computations using this dynein model demonstrate that very simple and realistic ideas about dynein mechanochemistry are sufficient for explaining the separation and reattachment seen experimentally with flagellar doublet pairs. Additional simulations were performed after adding a “super-adhesion” elasticity. This elastic component is intended to mimic interdoublet connections, normally present in an intact axoneme, that would prevent visible splitting but allow sufficient separation to cause dynein detachment and cessation of shear force generation. This is the situation envisioned by Lindemann's “geometric clutch” hypothesis for control of dynein function in flagella and cilia. The simulations show abrupt disengagement of the “clutch” at one end of a bend, and abrupt reengagement of the “clutch” at the other end of a bend, ensuring that active sliding is only operating where it will cause bend propagation from base to tip.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cm.21168 DOIArticle
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cm.21168/abstractPublisherArticle
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cm.21168/suppinfoPublisherSupporting Information
Additional Information:© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Received 3 November 2013; Revised 30 January 2014; Accepted 6 February 2014.
Subject Keywords:axoneme; buckling; cilia; motility; oscillation
Issue or Number:4
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20140515-130406127
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20140515-130406127
Official Citation:Brokaw, C. J. (2014), Computer simulation of flagellar movement X: Doublet pair splitting and bend propagation modeled using stochastic dynein kinetics. Cytoskeleton, 71: 273–284. doi: 10.1002/cm.21168
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:45769
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:15 May 2014 20:27
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 06:35

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