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Observing liquid flow in nanotubes by 4D electron microscopy

Lorenz, Ulrich J. and Zewail, Ahmed H. (2014) Observing liquid flow in nanotubes by 4D electron microscopy. Science, 344 (6191). pp. 1496-1500. ISSN 0036-8075. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20140620-095420088

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Abstract

Nanofluidics involves the study of fluid transport in nanometer-scale structures. We report the direct observation of fluid dynamics in a single zinc oxide nanotube with the high spatial and temporal resolution of four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy. The nanotube is filled with metallic lead, which we melt in situ with a temperature jump induced by a heating laser pulse. We then use a short electron pulse to create an image of the ensuing dynamics of the hot liquid. Single-shot images elucidate the mechanism of irreversible processes, whereas stroboscopic diffraction patterns provide the heating and cooling rates of single nanotubes. The temporal changes of the images enable studies of the viscous friction involved in the flow of liquid within the nanotube, as well as studies of mechanical processes such as those that result in the formation of extrusions.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1253618DOIArticle
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/344/6191/1496.abstractPublisherArticle
Additional Information:© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. Received for publication 19 March 2014. Accepted for publication 27 May 2014. Supported by NSF grant DMR-0964886 and Air Force Office of Scientific Research grant FA9550-11-1-0055 in the Physical Biology Center for Ultrafast Science and Technology at Caltech, which is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. U.J.L. was partly supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from the Swiss National Science Foundation. www.sciencemag.org/content/344/6191/1496/suppl/DC1 Materials and Methods Supplementary Text Figs. S1 to S6 Movies S1 and S2 References (34–40)
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSFDMR-0964886
Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR)FA9550-11-1-0055
Gordon and Betty Moore FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF)UNSPECIFIED
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20140620-095420088
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20140620-095420088
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:46394
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: George Porter
Deposited On:26 Jun 2014 18:18
Last Modified:15 Dec 2014 20:56

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