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A Study of Al–Mn Transition Edge Sensor Engineering for Stability

George, E. M. and Lueker, M. and Shirokoff, E. (2014) A Study of Al–Mn Transition Edge Sensor Engineering for Stability. Journal of Low Temperature Physics, 176 (3-4). pp. 383-391. ISSN 0022-2291. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20140731-153244722

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Abstract

The stability of Al–Mn transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers is studied as we vary the engineered TES transition, heat capacity, and/or coupling between the heat capacity and TES. We present thermal structure measurements of each of the 39 designs tested. The data is accurately fit by a two-body bolometer model, which allows us to extract the basic TES parameters that affect device stability. We conclude that parameters affecting device stability can be engineered for optimal device operation, and present the model parameters extracted for the different TES designs.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10909-013-0994-3DOIArticle
http://arxiv.org/abs/1311.2245arXivDiscussion Paper
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10909-013-0994-3PublisherArticle
http://rdcu.be/tvUiPublisherFree ReadCube access
Additional Information:© 2014 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2 August 2013. Accepted: 29 November 2013. Published online: 10 January 2014. Work at the University of Colorado is supported by the NSF through grant AST-0705302. Work at NIST is supported by the NIST Innovations in Measurement Science program. The McGill authors acknowledge funding from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, and Canada Research Chairs program. MD acknowledges support from an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship. Work at the University of Chicago is supported by grants from the NSF (awards ANT-0638937 and PHY-0114422), the Kavli Foundation, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. Work at Argonne National Lab is supported by UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). Argonne, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. We acknowledge support from the Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSFAST-0705302
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)UNSPECIFIED
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)UNSPECIFIED
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR)UNSPECIFIED
Canada Research Chairs ProgramUNSPECIFIED
Alfred P. Sloan FoundationUNSPECIFIED
NSFANT-0638937
NSFPHY-0114422
Kavli FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Gordon and Betty Moore FoundationUNSPECIFIED
UChicago Argonne, LLCUNSPECIFIED
Department of Energy (DOE)DE-AC02-06CH11357
Argonne Center for Nanoscale MaterialsUNSPECIFIED
Issue or Number:3-4
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20140731-153244722
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20140731-153244722
Official Citation:George, E.M., Austermann, J.E., Beall, J.A. et al. J Low Temp Phys (2014) 176: 383. doi:10.1007/s10909-013-0994-3
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:47741
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Ruth Sustaita
Deposited On:31 Jul 2014 22:59
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 06:56

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