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The Drosophila caspase Ice is important for many apoptotic cell deaths and for spermatid individualization, a nonapoptotic process

Muro, Israel and Berry, Deborah L. and Huh, Jun R. and Chen, Chun Hong and Huang, Haixia and Yoo, Soon Ji and Guo, Ming and Baehrecke, Eric H. and Hay, Bruce A. (2006) The Drosophila caspase Ice is important for many apoptotic cell deaths and for spermatid individualization, a nonapoptotic process. Development, 133 (17). pp. 3305-3315. ISSN 0950-1991. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:MURdev06

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Abstract

Caspase family proteases play important roles in the regulation of apoptotic cell death. Initiator caspases are activated in response to death stimuli, and they transduce and amplify these signals by cleaving and thereby activating effector caspases. In Drosophila, the initiator caspase Nc (previously Dronc) cleaves and activates two short-prodomain caspases, Dcp-1 and Ice (previously Drice), suggesting these as candidate effectors of Nc killing activity. dcp-1-null mutants are healthy and possess few defects in normally occurring cell death. To explore roles for Ice in cell death, we generated and characterized an Ice null mutant. Animals lacking Ice show a number of defects in cell death, including those that occur during embryonic development, as well as during formation of adult eyes, arista and wings. Ice mutants exhibit subtle defects in the destruction of larval tissues, and do not prevent destruction of salivary glands during metamorphosis. Cells from Ice animals are also markedly resistant to several stresses, including X-irradiation and inhibition of protein synthesis. Mutations in Ice also suppress cell death that is induced by expression of Rpr, Wrinkled (previously Hid) and Grim. These observations demonstrate that Ice plays an important non-redundant role as a cell death effector. Finally, we demonstrate that Ice participates in, but is not absolutely required for, the non-apoptotic process of spermatid differentiation.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.02495DOIUNSPECIFIED
http://dev.biologists.org/cgi/content/abstract/133/17/3305PublisherUNSPECIFIED
Additional Information:© The Company of Biologists Ltd 2006. Accepted 5 June 2006. First published online 3 August 2006. Financial support was provided by NIH grant GM057422 to B.A.H., by NIH grant GM59136 to E.H.B., and by NIH grants NS042580 and NS048396 to M.G. Supplementary material for this article is available at http://dev.biologists.org/cgi/content/full/133/17/3305/DC1
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NIHGM057422
NIHGM59136
NIHNS042580
NIHNS048396
Subject Keywords:Drosophila, Ice, Apoptosis
Issue or Number:17
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:MURdev06
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:MURdev06
Official Citation:Israel Muro, Deborah L. Berry, Jun R. Huh, Chun Hong Chen, Haixia Huang, Soon Ji Yoo, Ming Guo, Eric H. Baehrecke, and Bruce A. Hay The Drosophila caspase Ice is important for many apoptotic cell deaths and for spermatid individualization, a nonapoptotic process First published online on 1 Sep 2006 Development 133, 10.1242/dev.02495 (2006)
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:4817
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Archive Administrator
Deposited On:08 Sep 2006
Last Modified:12 Dec 2019 17:06

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