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Flow of supersonic jets across flat plates: Implications for ground-level flow from volcanic blasts

Orescanin, Mara M. and Prisco, David and Austin, Joanna M. and Kieffer, Susan W. (2014) Flow of supersonic jets across flat plates: Implications for ground-level flow from volcanic blasts. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 119 (4). pp. 2976-2987. ISSN 0148-0227. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20140924-141800336

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Abstract

We report on laboratory experiments examining the interaction of a jet from an overpressurized reservoir with a canonical ground surface to simulate lateral blasts at volcanoes such as the 1980 blast at Mount St. Helens. These benchmark experiments test the application of supersonic jet models to simulate the flow of volcanic jets over a lateral topography. The internal shock structure of the free jet is modified such that the Mach disk shock is elevated above the surface. In elevation view, the width of the shock is reduced in comparison with a free jet, while in map view the dimensions are comparable. The distance of the Mach disk shock from the vent is in good agreement with free jet data and can be predicted with existing theory. The internal shock structures can interact with and penetrate the boundary layer. In the shock-boundary layer interaction, an oblique shock foot is present in the schlieren images and a distinctive ground signature is evident in surface measurements. The location of the oblique shock foot and the surface demarcation are closely correlated with the Mach disk shock location during reservoir depletion, and therefore, estimates of a ground signature in a zone devastated by a blast can be based on the calculated shock location from free jet theory. These experiments, combined with scaling arguments, suggest that the imprint of the Mach disk shock on the ground should be within the range of 4–9 km at Mount St. Helens depending on assumed reservoir pressure and vent dimensions.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2013JB010743 DOIArticle
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2013JB010743/abstractPublisherArticle
Additional Information:© 2014 American Geophysical Union. Received 2 OCT 2013; Accepted 1 APR 2014; Accepted article online 3 APR 2014; Published online 24 APR 2014. This work was supported in part by NSF grant EAR06-09712, NSF grant SK2008-0035 8, and NASA grant NNX08AN10G. S.W.K. thanks the Charles R. Walgreen Jr. Foundation for support. The authors gratefully acknowledge Matthew Leibowitz and Miquela Trujillo at the University of Illinois for their contributions to the experimental data.
Group:GALCIT
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NSFEAR06-09712
NSFSK2008-0035 8
NASANNX08AN10G
Charles R. Walgreen Jr. FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:supersonic jets; lateral blast
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20140924-141800336
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20140924-141800336
Official Citation:Orescanin, M. M., D. Prisco, J. M. Austin, and S. W. Kieffer (2014), Flow of supersonic jets across flat plates: Implications for ground-level flow from volcanic blasts, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 119, 2976–2987, doi:10.1002/2013JB010743
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:50004
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:25 Sep 2014 20:05
Last Modified:20 Sep 2016 23:02

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