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Improved cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of the SDSS-II and SNLS supernova samples

Betoule, M. and Ellis, R. S. (2014) Improved cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of the SDSS-II and SNLS supernova samples. Astronomy and Astrophysics, 568 . Art. No. A22. ISSN 0004-6361. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20141021-094524754

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Abstract

Aims. We present cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observations obtained by the SDSS-II and SNLS collaborations. The dataset includes several low-redshift samples (z< 0.1), all three seasons from the SDSS-II (0.05 <z< 0.4), and three years from SNLS (0.2 <z< 1), and it totals 740 spectroscopically confirmed type Ia supernovae with high-quality light curves. Methods. We followed the methods and assumptions of the SNLS three-year data analysis except for the following important improvements: 1) the addition of the full SDSS-II spectroscopically-confirmed SN Ia sample in both the training of the SALT2 light-curve model and in the Hubble diagram analysis (374 SNe); 2) intercalibration of the SNLS and SDSS surveys and reduced systematic uncertainties in the photometric calibration, performed blindly with respect to the cosmology analysis; and 3) a thorough investigation of systematic errors associated with the SALT2 modeling of SN Ia light curves. Results. We produce recalibrated SN Ia light curves and associated distances for the SDSS-II and SNLS samples. The large SDSS-II sample provides an effective, independent, low-z anchor for the Hubble diagram and reduces the systematic error from calibration systematics in the low-z SN sample. For a flat ΛCDM cosmology, we find Ωm =0.295 ± 0.034 (stat+sys), a value consistent with the most recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurement from the Planck and WMAP experiments. Our result is 1.8σ (stat+sys) different than the previously published result of SNLS three-year data. The change is due primarily to improvements in the SNLS photometric calibration. When combined with CMB constraints, we measure a constant dark-energy equation of state parameter w =−1.018 ± 0.057 (stat+sys) for a flat universe. Adding baryon acoustic oscillation distance measurements gives similar constraints: w =−1.027 ± 0.055. Our supernova measurements provide the most stringent constraints to date on the nature of dark energy.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://www.aanda.org/articles/aa/abs/2014/08/aa23413-14/aa23413-14.htmlPublisherArticle
http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201423413DOIArticle
http://arxiv.org/abs/1401.4064arXivArticle
Additional Information:© 2014 ESO. Received 13 January 2014. Accepted 9 April 2014. Published online 08 August 2014. Funding for the SDSS and SDSS-II has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Participating Institutions, the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Japanese Monbukagakusho, the Max Planck Society, and the Higher Education Funding Council for England. The SDSS Web Site is http://www.sdss.org/. The SDSS is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium for the Participating Institutions. The Participating Institutions are the American Museum of Natural History, Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, University of Basel, Cambridge University, Case Western Reserve University, University of Chicago, Drexel University, Fermilab, the Institute for Advanced Study, the Japan Participation Group, Johns Hopkins University, the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, the Korean Scientist Group, the Chinese Academy of Sciences (LAMOST), Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), the Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics (MPA), New Mexico State University, Ohio State University, University of Pittsburgh, University of Portsmouth, Princeton University, the United States Naval Observatory, and the University of Washington. The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximillians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen. The HET is named in honor of its principal benefactors, William P. Hobby and Robert E. Eberly. The Marcario Low-Resolution Spectrograph is named for Mike Marcario of High Lonesome Optics, who fabricated several optics for the instrument but died before its completion; it is a joint project of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope partnership and the Instituto de Astronomía de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. The Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium. We thank the observatory director, Suzanne Hawley, and site manager, Bruce Gillespie, for their support of this project. The Subaru Telescope is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. The William Herschel Telescope is operated by the Isaac Newton Group, and the Nordic Optical Telescope is operated jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, both on the island of La Palma in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Observations at the ESO New Technology Telescope at La Silla Observatory were made under programme IDs 77.A-0437, 78.A-0325, and 79.A-0715. Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. The WIYN Observatory is a joint facility of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories. The W. M. Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The South African Large Telescope of the South African Astronomical Observatory is operated by a partnership between the National Research Foundation of South Africa, Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center of the Polish Academy of Sciences, the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Board, Rutgers University, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Canterbury, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Dartmough College, Carnegie Mellon University, and the United Kingdom SALT consortium. The Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) is operated by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the Italian INAF (Istituo Nazionale di Astrofisica) on the island of La Palma in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. This paper is based in part on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/IRFU, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l’Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. Part of the results are derived from observations obtained with Planck (http://www.esa.int/Planck), an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States, NASA, and Canada. We also makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation. We acknowledge the use of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This work was completed in part with resources provided by the University of Chicago Research Computing Center. The French authors acknowledge support from CNRS/IN2P3, CNRS/INSU and CEA. G.L. is supported by the Swedish Research Council through grant No. 623-2011-7117. DARK is funded by DNRF. J.F. and R.K. are grateful for the support of National Science Foundation grant 1009457, a grant from France and Chicago Collaborating in the Sciences (FACCTS), and support from the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago. A.V.F. has received generous financial assistance from the Christopher R. Redlich Fund, the TABASGO Foundation, and NSF grant AST-1211916. MSu acknowledges support from the Royal Society.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Alfred P. Sloan FoundationUNSPECIFIED
Department of Energy (DOE)UNSPECIFIED
NASAUNSPECIFIED
Japanese MonbukagakushoUNSPECIFIED
Max Planck SocietyUNSPECIFIED
Higher Education Funding Council for England UNSPECIFIED
W. M. Keck FoundationUNSPECIFIED
ESA Member StatesUNSPECIFIED
CanadaUNSPECIFIED
NASA/JPL/CaltechUNSPECIFIED
CNRS/IN2P3UNSPECIFIED
CNRS/INSU and CEAUNSPECIFIED
Swedish Research Council623-2011-7117
DNRF UNSPECIFIED
NSF1009457
France and Chicago Collaborating in the Sciences (FACCTS)UNSPECIFIED
University of Chicago Kavli Institute for Cosmological PhysicsUNSPECIFIED
Christopher R. Redlich FundUNSPECIFIED
TABASGO FoundationUNSPECIFIED
NSFAST-1211916
Royal SocietyUNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:cosmology: observations, distance scale, dark energy
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20141021-094524754
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20141021-094524754
Official Citation:Improved cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of the SDSS-II and SNLS supernova samples M. Betoule, R. Kessler, J. Guy, J. Mosher, D. Hardin, R. Biswas, P. Astier, P. El-Hage, M. Konig, S. Kuhlmann, J. Marriner, R. Pain, N. Regnault, C. Balland, B. A. Bassett, P. J. Brown, H. Campbell, R. G. Carlberg, F. Cellier-Holzem, D. Cinabro, A. Conley, C. B. D’Andrea, D. L. DePoy, M. Doi, R. S. Ellis, S. Fabbro, A. V. Filippenko, R. J. Foley, J. A. Frieman, D. Fouchez, L. Galbany, A. Goobar, R. R. Gupta, G. J. Hill, R. Hlozek, C. J. Hogan, I. M. Hook, D. A. Howell, S. W. Jha, L. Le Guillou, G. Leloudas, C. Lidman, J. L. Marshall, A. Möller, A. M. Mourão, J. Neveu, R. Nichol, M. D. Olmstead, N. Palanque-Delabrouille, S. Perlmutter, J. L. Prieto, C. J. Pritchet, M. Richmond, A. G. Riess, V. Ruhlmann-Kleider, M. Sako, K. Schahmaneche, D. P. Schneider, M. Smith, J. Sollerman, M. Sullivan, N. A. Walton and C. J. Wheeler A&A 568 A22 (2014) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201423413
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:50597
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Ruth Sustaita
Deposited On:21 Oct 2014 18:02
Last Modified:21 Oct 2014 18:02

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