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Visibility-reducing organic aerosols in the vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park: Properties observed by high resolution gas chromatography

Mazurek, Monica A. and Masonjones, Michael C. and Salmon, Lynn G. and Cass, Glen R. and Hallock, Kristen A. and Leach, Martin (1997) Visibility-reducing organic aerosols in the vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park: Properties observed by high resolution gas chromatography. Journal of Geophysical Research. Atmospheres, 102 (D3). pp. 3779-3793. ISSN 2169-897X. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20141028-133112493

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Abstract

Fine particle and total airborne particle samples were collected during August 1989 within the Grand Canyon (Indian Gardens (IG)) and on its south rim (Hopi Point (HP)) to define summertime organic aerosol concentration and composition as a function of elevation at Grand Canyon National Park. Inorganic chemical constituents were analyzed also to help place the relative importance of organics in perspective. Fine particle organic aerosols were approximately equal in concentration to sulfate aerosols at both sites. Monthly average mass concentrations for fine aerosol organics ranged from 1.1 μg m(−3) (IG) to 1.3 μg m^(−3) (HP), while the organic aerosol concentration within total suspended particulate matter samples ranged from 1.9 μg m^(−3) (IG) to 2.1 μg m^(−3) (HP). Aerosol organics that could be evaluated by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) (elutable organics) constituted 27% to 53% of the total organics mass collected as fine or total aerosol. At each site, roughly half of the elutable organics fine aerosol fraction was composed of highly polar organic compounds. Distributions of the elutable organics were compared to Los Angeles fine aerosol samples and to distributions of authentic sources of aerosol organics. It was found that the Grand Canyon organic aerosol during August 1989 did not resemble diluted aged Los Angeles organic aerosol, indicating that most of the organic particulate matter at the Grand Canyon at the time studied originated from other sources.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/96JD02719DOIArticle
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/96JD02719/abstractPublisherArticle
Additional Information:© 1997 American Geophysical Union. Received January 30, 1996; revised June 24, 1996; accepted June 28, 1996. This research received financial support from the University of California at Davis under their contracts no. CX-0001-8-0017 with the National Park Service. Additional support was provided by the U. S. Department of Energy under the Atmospheric Chemistry Program within the Office of Health and Environmental Research under contract no. DE-AC02-76CH00016. This work could not have been completed without the generous assistance of the park rangers at Grand Canyon National Park, including Polly Hayes, Dave Ashe, Jerry Chavez, and Linda Mazzu.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of California, DavisCX-0001-8-001
Department of Energy (DOE)DE-AC02-76CH00016
Issue or Number:D3
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20141028-133112493
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20141028-133112493
Official Citation:Mazurek, M., M. C. Masonjones, H. D. Masonjones, L. G. Salmon, G. R. Cass, K. A. Hallock, and M. Leach (1997), Visibility-reducing organic aerosols in the vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park: Properties observed by high resolution gas chromatography, J. Geophys. Res., 102(D3), 3779–3793, doi:10.1029/96JD02719.
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:50947
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Jason Perez
Deposited On:28 Oct 2014 23:25
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 07:28

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