CaltechAUTHORS
  A Caltech Library Service

The fate of organic matter during planetary accretion: preliminary studies of the organic chemistry of experimentally shocked Murchison meteorite

Tingle, Tracy N. and Tyburczy, James A. and Ahrens, Thomas J. and Becker, Christopher H. (1992) The fate of organic matter during planetary accretion: preliminary studies of the organic chemistry of experimentally shocked Murchison meteorite. Origins of life and evolution of the biosphere, 21 (5-6). pp. 385-397. ISSN 0169-6149. doi:10.1007/BF01808309. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20141029-132140835

Full text is not posted in this repository. Consult Related URLs below.

Use this Persistent URL to link to this item: https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20141029-132140835

Abstract

It is possible that Earth's biologic precursors were delivered by late-impacting asteroids or comets, and it is possible that these objects were a source of Earth's volatile inventory. To understand the behavior of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites during hypervelocity impact (1–2 km s^(−1)), three samples of the Murchison (CM2) carbonaceous chondrite were shocked to 19, 20 and 36 GPa and analyzed by very sensitive thermal-desorption photoionization mass spectrometry (SALI). Thermal-desorption (25–800 °C) SALI mass spectra of unshocked Murchison reveal indigenous aliphatic, aromatic, sulfur and organosulfur compounds. Samples shocked to ≈20 GPa exhibit little or no loss of organic matter relative to the unshocked material. This is consistent with the earlier work of Tyburczyet al. (1986) which showed that incipient devolatilization of Murchison occurs at peak shock pressures near 20 GPa. The small amount of organic matter lost appears to have occurred by volatilization of elemental sulfur, amines and aliphatic compounds. In the sample shocked to 36 GPa, approximately 70% of the organic matter was volatilized as a result of impact. The residual organic matter desorbed at somewhat higher temperatures and displayed a different chemical signature. In particular, the shocked material has a lower alkene/alkane ratio than that of the starting material. The preliminary data suggest that it is unlikely that the indigenous organic matter in carbonaceous chondrite-like planetesimals could have survived impact on the Earth in the later stages of Earth's accretion. However, chemical reactions that produce organic compounds with greater thermal stabilities may occur during impact or subsequent to impact by condensation of the impact-produced vapor plume.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01808309DOIArticle
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF01808309PublisherArticle
Additional Information:© 1992 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Received December 17, 1991. The authors would like to thank J. F. Kerridge and M. H. Engel for thorough and constructive reviews. TNT and CHB acknowledge financial support from Gas Research Institute grant 5087-260-1626 and technical assistance from L. Jusinski, W. Olson, and S. Young at SRI International. E. Gelle and M. Long provided assistance with the shock experiments. TJA acknowledges ,financial support from NASA grants NAGW-1941 and NAGW-1953. JAT acknowledges financial support from NSF Grant EAR86-09782. Contribution #5094, Division of Geological and Planetary Science, California Institute of Technology.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Gas Research Institute5087-260-1626
NASANAGW-1941
NASANAGW-1953
NSFEAR86-09782
Other Numbering System:
Other Numbering System NameOther Numbering System ID
Caltech Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences5094
Issue or Number:5-6
DOI:10.1007/BF01808309
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20141029-132140835
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20141029-132140835
Official Citation:Tingle, T., Tyburczy, J., Ahrens, T., & Becker, C. (1991). The fate of organic matter during planetary accretion: Preliminary studies of the organic chemistry of experimentally shocked murchison meteorite. Origins of life and evolution of the biosphere, 21(5-6), 385-397. doi: 10.1007/bf01808309
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:51015
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Jason Perez
Deposited On:30 Oct 2014 16:19
Last Modified:10 Nov 2021 19:04

Repository Staff Only: item control page