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Specialized Metabolites from the Microbiome in Health and Disease

Sharon, Gil and Garg, Neha and Debelius, Justine W. and Knight, Rob and Dorrestein, Pieter C. and Mazmanian, Sarkis K. (2014) Specialized Metabolites from the Microbiome in Health and Disease. Cell Metabolism, 20 (5). pp. 719-730. ISSN 1550-4131. PMCID PMC4337795. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20141111-131454984

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Abstract

The microbiota, and the genes that comprise its microbiome, play key roles in human health. Host-microbe interactions affect immunity, metabolism, development, and behavior, and dysbiosis of gut bacteria contributes to disease. Despite advances in correlating changes in the microbiota with various conditions, specific mechanisms of host-microbiota signaling remain largely elusive. We discuss the synthesis of microbial metabolites, their absorption, and potential physiological effects on the host. We propose that the effects of specialized metabolites may explain present knowledge gaps in linking the gut microbiota to biological host mechanisms during initial colonization, and in health and disease.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2014.10.016DOIArticle
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4337795PubMed CentralArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Sharon, Gil0000-0002-4605-9943
Debelius, Justine W.0000-0002-8605-3546
Knight, Rob0000-0002-0975-9019
Mazmanian, Sarkis K.0000-0003-2713-1513
Additional Information:© 2014 Elsevier Inc. We thank Dr. Hiutung Chu (Caltech) for comments on the manuscript. We thank two anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments on this manuscript. We apologize for not including many other relevant studies due to space constraints. Supported by Human Frontiers Science Program – Long-term fellowship (for G.S.). Work in the authors’ laboratories is supported by funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (to R.K.); a metabolomics supplement to parent grant NIH GM095384, UCSD Clinical and Translational Research Institute Pilot award UL1TR000100 and NIH AI095125 (to P.C.D.); and the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America, Autism Speaks, and the NIH DK078938; GM099535; MH100556 (to S.K.M.). P.C.D. and S.K.M. serve as consultants for a company that is developing microbiome-based technologies.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Human Frontier Science ProgramUNSPECIFIED
NIHUNSPECIFIED
Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of AmericaUNSPECIFIED
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)UNSPECIFIED
NIHGM095384
NIHUL1TR000100
NIHAI095125
Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of AmericaUNSPECIFIED
Autism SpeaksUNSPECIFIED
NIHDK078938
NIHGM099535
NIHMH100556
Issue or Number:5
PubMed Central ID:PMC4337795
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20141111-131454984
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20141111-131454984
Official Citation:Gil Sharon, Neha Garg, Justine Debelius, Rob Knight, Pieter C. Dorrestein, Sarkis K. Mazmanian, Specialized Metabolites from the Microbiome in Health and Disease, Cell Metabolism, Volume 20, Issue 5, 2014, Pages 719-730, ISSN 1550-4131, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2014.10.016. (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S155041311400463X)
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:51586
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:11 Nov 2014 21:22
Last Modified:14 Apr 2020 23:09

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