CaltechAUTHORS
  A Caltech Library Service

Trends in odor intensity for human and electronic noses: Relative roles of odorant vapor pressure vs. molecularly specific odorant binding

Doleman, Brett J. and Severin, Erik J. and Lewis, Nathan S. (1998) Trends in odor intensity for human and electronic noses: Relative roles of odorant vapor pressure vs. molecularly specific odorant binding. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 95 (10). pp. 5442-5447. ISSN 0027-8424. PMCID PMC20396. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20141126-100946285

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
See Usage Policy.

260Kb

Use this Persistent URL to link to this item: https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20141126-100946285

Abstract

Response data were collected for a carbon black-polymer composite electronic nose array during exposure to homologous series of alkanes and alcohols. The mean response intensity of the electronic nose detectors and the response intensity of the most strongly driven set of electronic nose detectors were essentially constant for members of a chemically homologous odorant series when the concentration of each odorant in the gas phase was maintained at a constant fraction of the odorant’s vapor pressure. A similar trend is observed in human odor detection threshold values for these same homologous series of odorants. Because the thermodynamic activity of an odorant at equilibrium in a sorbent phase is equal to the partial pressure of the odorant in the gas phase divided by the vapor pressure of the odorant and because the activity coefficients are similar within these homologous series of odorants for sorption of the vapors into specific polymer films, the data imply that the trends in detector response can be understood based on the thermodynamic tendency to establish a relatively constant concentration of sorbed odorant into each of the polymeric films of the electronic nose at a constant fraction of the odorant’s vapor pressure. Similarly, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that the odor detection thresholds observed in human psychophysical experiments for the odorants studied herein are driven predominantly by the similarity in odorant concentrations sorbed into the olfactory epithelium at a constant fraction of the odorant’s vapor pressure.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.95.10.5442DOIArticle
http://www.pnas.org/content/95/10/5442PublisherArticle
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC20396/PubMed CentralArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Lewis, Nathan S.0000-0001-5245-0538
Additional Information:© 1998 The National Academy of Sciences. Communicated by John E. Bercaw, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, March 2, 1998 (received for review August 22, 1997). We acknowledge Prof. J. Bower and C. Chee-Ruiter of Caltech for numerous helpful discussions and for their critical comments on this manuscript. We thank the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Army Research Office, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency for their support of this work, and B.D. acknowledges the Government of Canada for a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council 1967 Centennial Graduate Fellowship. The publication costs of this article were defrayed in part by page charge payment. This article must therefore be hereby marked ‘‘advertisement’’ in accordance with 18 U.S.C. §1734 solely to indicate this fact.
Funders:
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NASAUNSPECIFIED
Army Research Office (ARO)UNSPECIFIED
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)UNSPECIFIED
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)UNSPECIFIED
Subject Keywords:carbon black composites; olfaction; vapor sensor; odor threshold
Issue or Number:10
PubMed Central ID:PMC20396
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20141126-100946285
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20141126-100946285
Official Citation:Doleman, B. J., Severin, E. J., & Lewis, N. S. (1998). Trends in odor intensity for human and electronic noses: Relative roles of odorant vapor pressure vs. molecularly specific odorant binding. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 95(10), 5442-5447.
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:52177
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Jason Perez
Deposited On:26 Nov 2014 19:12
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 07:40

Repository Staff Only: item control page