CaltechAUTHORS
  A Caltech Library Service

Biomolecular Materials

Tirrell, Jane G. and Fournier, Maurille J. and Mason, Thomas L. and Tirrell, David A. (1994) Biomolecular Materials. Chemical and Engineering News, 72 (51). pp. 40-51. ISSN 0009-2347. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150303-165455885

Full text is not posted in this repository. Consult Related URLs below.

Use this Persistent URL to link to this item: https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150303-165455885

Abstract

The second half of the 20th century has witnessed a productive interplay between chemistry and materials science—in fields as varied as polymers, catalysis, interface science, ceramics, and electronic materials. Society also has enjoyed the spectacular results-most notably in information and communications technologies—achieved by merging condensed matter physics and materials research. In contrast, connections between materials science and biology have been relatively weak. To be sure, materials research has made important contributions to medicine, but the discipline has yet to draw on biology in the same way that it has absorbed people, ideas, and skills from chemistry and physics. This is beginning to change. With increasing frequency, new materials or processing strategies are emerging, inspired by biological examples or developed directly from biological systems. Already, researchers are engineering bacteria or other organisms to synthesize monomers for polymer production. They are synthesizing and expressing artificial genes to produce proteinlike materials with the mechanical properties of silk, collagen, or other materials containing elastic fibers. They are beginning to use phospholipids as templates for electronic materials; make synthetic phospholipid vesicles that, like proteins, respond to signals; use stereoselective catalyses to produce optically active polymers from racernic starting materials; and develop protein- and lipid-based sensors. Chemists are playing a vital role in these developments, providing synthetic skills as well as insights into the behavior of complex molecular systems.


Item Type:Article
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/cen-v072n051.p040DOIArticle
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/cen-v072n051.p040PublisherArticle
ORCID:
AuthorORCID
Tirrell, David A.0000-0003-3175-4596
Additional Information:Copyright © 1994 AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY. Publication Date: December 19, 1994.
Issue or Number:51
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20150303-165455885
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150303-165455885
Official Citation:Biomolecular Materials JANE G. TIRRELL, MAURILLE J. FOURNIER, THOMAS L. MASON, and DAVID A. TIRREL Chemical & Engineering News Archive 1994 72 (51), 40-51 DOI: 10.1021/cen-v072n051.p040
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:54563
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Anne Hormann
Deposited On:04 Mar 2015 01:03
Last Modified:03 Oct 2019 07:58

Repository Staff Only: item control page