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Low-temperature thermochronology of the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains, southern California: Constraining structural evolution

Blythe, Ann E. and House, Martha A. and Spotila, James A. (2002) Low-temperature thermochronology of the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains, southern California: Constraining structural evolution. In: Contributions to Crustal Evolution of the Southwestern United States. Special papers (Geological Society of America). No.365. Geological Society of America , Boulder, CO, pp. 231-250. ISBN 9780813723655. https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150209-154220360

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Abstract

Recently, apatite fission-track and (U-Th)/He analyses have been used to constrain the low temperature thermal history of the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains of the central Transverse Ranges of southern California. In this paper, we use these data to estimate the timing of initiation of exhumation (uplift and erosion) on fault blocks within both ranges. We calculate average exhumation rates for different time intervals and reconstruct the evolution of both ranges and adjacent fault blocks over the past 12 m.y. using the Matti and Morton (1993) reconstructions as a base. With these reconstructions we are able to evaluate the variations in response (indicated by exhumation rate) to tectonic forces as the San Gabriel Mountains moved past the San Bernardino Mountains. In general, the San Bernardino Mountains have a much simpler exhumational and structural history than the San Gabriel Mountains, with the most recent phase of exhumation and uplift of geomorphic surfaces beginning ca. 2.5 Ma. This time is long after the most recent phases of exhumation began on fault blocks within the San Gabriel Mountains. There, distinct variations in fault-block exhumation patterns began ca. 12 Ma, when the southern strand of the San Gabriel fault became active. We conclude that although some similarities in exhumational history between the two ranges are evident beginning ca. 3-2.5 Ma, the differences in exhumational patterns between the two ranges indicate that they are not reacting similarly to regional tectonic stresses. The exhumational patterns observed suggest that the San Jacinto Mountains-Peninsular Ranges province is acting as an indentor, controlling when faults have turned on and off and the loci of highest exhumation rates.


Item Type:Book Section
Related URLs:
URLURL TypeDescription
http://dx.doi.org/10.1130/0-8137-2365-5.231DOIArticle
http://specialpapers.gsapubs.org/content/365/231PublisherArticle
Additional Information:© 2002 Geological Society of America. Manuscript accepted by the Society February 8, 2002. Conversations with Doug Morton, James Dolan and David Bowman helped clarify ideas. Nathan Neimi, Matt D' Allessio, and Marcos Marin assisted with the DEM figures. Reviews by Jon Matti, Andrew Barth and an anonymous reviewer greatly improved the original manuscript and are very much appreciated.
Series Name:Special papers (Geological Society of America)
Issue or Number:365
DOI:10.1130/0-8137-2365-5.231
Record Number:CaltechAUTHORS:20150209-154220360
Persistent URL:https://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechAUTHORS:20150209-154220360
Official Citation:Ann E. Blythe, Martha A. House, and James A. Spotila Low-temperature thermochronology of the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains, southern California: Constraining structural evolution Geological Society of America Special Papers, 2002, 365, p. 231-250, doi:10.1130/0-8137-2365-5.231
Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:54585
Collection:CaltechAUTHORS
Deposited By: Tony Diaz
Deposited On:10 Feb 2015 05:10
Last Modified:10 Nov 2021 20:35

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